View topic - 2 Peaks and a Paddle - (Pic heavy TR)

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PostPosted: August 31st, 2008, 11:21 am 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
A few pics from from different trips on our holidays.

First was hiking part of the Heather Trail in Manning Park. The weather was stinkin' hot and dusty. No complaints. Our objective was reaching the top of the First Brother.

My wife and I & our 2 dogs were joined on the first night by her sister Maryanne her husband Mike, and their dog Dallas. We packed our stuff down the hill and set up at Buckhorn campsite. With the heat, we ended up lazing around camp and eating way too much spaghetti.
The next morning we said goodbye to M&M&D, had breakfast, and started up the hill. We decided to leave our stuff set up and return to the same site for our second night.
First two kms up the hill slowly coming out of the trees, then 3 kms of endless views till the First Brother Trail intersection. Straight up from there and we're at the top! We had lunch at the top, then descended to the small pond on the Heather trail for a water break for the girls and a shade break for me. Had another beautiful night at Buckhorn and a great sleep in. Lots of breakfast and strong coffee, then the short walk back to the car. We ended up walking up to the tower/viewpoint loop on the way back. We met several nice people.

This was my wife's first major mountain climb. Everything was perfect! I hope we've created a monster!

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After returning to Chilliwack we prepped for a paddle on Harrison Lake. Seeing as we were one boat, we decided to paddle up to Long Island and not get too far up the lake in case of bad weather.

Launching from the boat launch in Harrison Hot Springs, we loaded up the Tripper with our gear and our two dogs and headed off. Of course there is quite a headwind which thankfully died off after and hour or so. We ended up taking a mid-day break to avoid the sun and have some lunch.
Launching on a Sunday, we expected to see a few people packing up and leaving. We were suprised to see so many campers (from the road access sites) and what looked like day trippers in big boats on the many beaches.
We ended up paddling for a while and stopped at Eagle Falls which is just across from the southern tip of Long Island.
Catching up on sleep, we slept in. Had a nice breakfast and started packing up for a short downwind paddle to the island. Of course the wind was picking up the whole time and when we finally launched it was one of those "what do you think?" moments. Well, we poked our nose out and bobbed for a while, then decided to wait it out. On our way back in a breaking wave soaked me and my two little doggies. Good call on waiting because it just got uglier. So we set up the tarp again and decided to paddle later in the day.
Six hours later and no sign of wind or rain letting up. Time to set up the tent again. We have a hard time sitting still so this forced us to relax.

Get this, my wife forgot her journal and had no writing stick for her Sudoku puzzle. While poking around on the beach, what does she find?, a pencil.

So the next morning we decide to head out early and slowly make our way back down the lake. It's already ugly by 8:00 with off and on rain, but it's a headwind blowing on shore so we batten down the hatches and head out. As long as we were careful, we didn't have too many waves break over the bow and only a couple of splashes on the dogs (when their snouts were too far out of the boat).

We ended up pulling off the water when things got a little more windy. Ended up having a 5-6 hour break. We made a nice wind/rain break with our tarp. Then paddled a little more before stopping for the night. A very windy and rainy night.

With the next day looking just as ugly as the others, we decide to paddle out on the Harrison River one day early instead of paddling around and camping at Rainbow Falls.

With just a few kms' till the river outlet, we decide to put our skirt to the test and make a run for it. Although the conditions were crazy, we felt very confident that it was do-able (is that a word?). I'm sure a few cabin owners were scared for us. We had one guy watching us with binoculars which is alway great for hairy paddling security.

Anyways, after finally making it to the calm waters of the river we bailed out a lot of water and relaxed again.

The water was very high in the river. Got to see seals, tons of big fish jumping all over, and some pictographs. Anybody know the authenticity of those?

Had planned on paddling into the Fraser and taking out at Island 22, but due to uncertainty and just being one boat, we opted to pull out at the Kilby River campsite. Next time!

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Next, we decided to go for a hike up Cheam Mnt. Looks like fresh snow up there!

After waiting for confirmation of a nice day and Annamarie's brother Herman to get off of work, we headed out and started hiking about 3:00. Maryanne and Mike with their dog Dallas joined us for 3/4 of the hike.

Ran into a few people on their way out. After crossing lots of fresh snow we finally made it to the summit! Another peak for Annamarie! Woo Hoo!

Light clouds started forming and combined with the wind, things cooled down very quickly. After taking a few summit shots, we started back down. Even got to see a little bear foraging on the hillside above us just below Spoon Lk.
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Finally, we had to make a day trip out to the previously missed Rainbow Falls on Harrison Lk.

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All in all, another great holiday. Lots learned and confirmed.

It's pretty cool getting to meet others from CCR. It was great to meet and chat with Westcoastpaddler at Western. Also, BCSUVan and his family were kind enough to invite us for a visit in Williams Lk. Glad to have met you guys and hope to do some paddling with you in the future!


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PostPosted: August 31st, 2008, 1:16 pm 
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Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
A fine combination of outings, and an excellent photo record.

We hiked the Heather Trail to Kicking Horse Camp and back in late July. Very nice except the campsite was grossly over-subscribed. This is part of a winter ski traverse from near the top of Allison Pass. Buckhorn Camp is one of the few places accessible by baby-buggy (Chariot) for those introducing infants to backcountry camping.

So far as I know, the pictrographs on the Harrison River are authentic.

Sorry we couldn't hook up with you, but we've been on a series of trips all month.

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PostPosted: August 31st, 2008, 2:06 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
Thanks Steve. We'll get together one of these times.

I thought those picts were real, my camera started acting funny and then konked out completely while there. (Twilight Zone music plays...)

Actually, I dropped it in a little bilge water for half a second then the batteries died.


So with all these trips...any TRs coming?


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PostPosted: September 1st, 2008, 5:51 pm 
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Would people pleeeeaaase stop dropping their cameras in the water.

Only two of our trips were canoe trips. The others were driving/relative visiting, and hiking and car camping in the Rockies. As for the canoe trips, one was a repeat of Vargas Island, and which I've written up. It had a couple of incidents beyond my comfort level, but I'm not sure they're newsworthy. The other was a minor trip to Thormanby Island.

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PostPosted: October 3rd, 2008, 4:23 pm 
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Very nice pictures Mr. Head. I see they do not appear in the gallery. So how do you post your pictures? I have noticed there is a paucity of photos on the forum. Is this a reflection of the effort required to post them? Again, thanks for the great photos. I like mountains.
Stencil


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PostPosted: October 3rd, 2008, 5:36 pm 
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Stencil, there's a number of photo-hosting websites out there. In this instance, canoeheadted is using http://imageshack.us/

You have an account in the CCR Gallery, that is free, and with the ability to hot-link (allows photos to be seen in the posts). Not all photo-hosting sites allow that.

No matter where the photos are stored, the coding to have them appear in a post on CCR is the same.
Code:
[img]http://img518.imageshack.us/img518/2933/tedandamonharrison037mg3.jpg[/img]


If there is a problem, let me know, and I'll try to help.



Barbara

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PostPosted: October 4th, 2008, 8:17 am 
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Barbara,
The problem is most definately my own computer illiteracy. I composed a much longer trip report but lost it all through some errant key-stroke. I find it difficult and time consuming to resize and collate the pictures, establish them in the gallery and then transfer them to a report. I see the wonderfull results of others but am too lazy and unskilled to duplicate it.
S


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PostPosted: October 5th, 2008, 3:01 pm 
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Location: Surrey, BC
Great pics, Ted. I like the doggy-PFD's. I bet your dogs love going on trips with you guys, eh? Dogs in camp can deter or at least give early warning of bears, but what're your thoughts on hiking through bear country with a dog? Are you worried they might encounter something they can't handle in the form of a huge griz, and come running back to you? Maybe not though, I know eskimos ate polar bears and their sled dogs did double duty in helping them kill the bruins. Maybe it depends on the kind of dog.

I've always feel safer within sight of a populated shoreline --- many paddlers have had their proverbial bacon pulled out of the fire by observant shore-dwellers. One fellow who lives in Howe Sound has saved several paddlers from the dreaded outflow winds which come barrelling down that mountain valley.

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Mariners must navigate these waters the same way a mouse negotiates a kitchen patrolled by cats: by darting furtively from one hiding place to the next.
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PostPosted: October 5th, 2008, 7:26 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
Thanks guys!

Tom, as far as the bear and dog scenario, I'm a big believer in having a well trained animal.

When your dog know what is allowed and not allowed this allows both parties to enjoy the outing (or any interaction). For example, our dogs always have to be within our sight. This allows us to command when needed or read their body language to anticipate problems. When entering different types of terrain or foliage, we will always announce ourselves. (HEY BEAR!) Our dogs are never allowed to chase any animals or wander off from camp. Now when the dogs come across any of those situations they automatically return to us because that's what they've been taught. We've probably had about 9-10 bear encounters (only one grizzly) that have all been good ones. We always carry one bearspray per person as well. This way, no matter who's getting attacked, at least someone may be able to do something. Even if it means spraying the whole group (dogs, people, bear).

We also paddle very close to shore so we can execute our own self rescue. The water is much too cold and when a rescue takes a long time the odds start stacking against you. Another reason why paddling with other (experienced, competent, trained) paddlers is a great way to start pushing the envelope safely.

Our sunny Francois paddle ended up turning into a very windy rough water paddle. So no pictures from this trip!

Honestly, I'm more worried about reckless people. (speeding cars, hunting, or just plain lack of safety)


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PostPosted: October 5th, 2008, 7:49 pm 
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Location: Surrey, BC
Good stuff --- well-trained dogs, staying close to shore --- sounds like you guys approach being on the water like I do, as something that requires carefull planning and not something you just wake up one morning and go and do.

Me too, I'm more worried about getting mown down by a drunken, reckless power-boater than drowning or getting capsized by breaking waves, eaten by bears, getting rammed by a lovesick swordfish, etc. That's one more reason I prefer isolated, remote areas, and also staying very close to shore can really reduce the risk of collisions.

I like the Harrison Lake photos --- I've done Chilliwack and Pitt lakes to death but have yet to paddle Harrison --- looks nice. Probably will do it next season.

regards

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Mariners must navigate these waters the same way a mouse negotiates a kitchen patrolled by cats: by darting furtively from one hiding place to the next.
"The Golden Spruce", John Vaillant


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PostPosted: October 6th, 2008, 8:52 am 
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Stencil wrote:
Barbara,
The problem is most definately my own computer illiteracy. I composed a much longer trip report but lost it all through some errant key-stroke.


I find it easier to choose the photos first, then write the text that goes with each photo after.

The best advice one can give is to write up the report in a program like WordPad on your computer first, and then save it.

Then, log into CCR, and make sure to tick off the box "log me in automatically each visit". Without doing that, you are in danger of timing out after 30 minutes.

Copy and paste the report into the message box. Hit the "preview" button first. Look over your report and make any changes, or insert any photos. Click "preview" again to check that all is in order. When you're happy with it, click "submit".
Quote:
I find it difficult and time consuming to resize and collate the pictures, establish them in the gallery and then transfer them to a report.

There's no getting around the time-consuming part. If the photos don't need any cropping or fixing, the option to email them to yourself is a quick and easy way to resize them. Then it's a matter of uploading them to the Gallery.

Explaining the process of uploading to the Gallery and putting the links into a post takes far, far longer than actually doing it. Practice on a few, and you will get the hang of it pretty quickly.

Very little computer skill is required....I'm proof of that! :wink:

Quote:
I see the wonderfull results of others but am too lazy and unskilled to duplicate it.

I can't help with the "lazy" part, because I've been guilty of that myself on occasion. :oops:

I find that it's easiest to just concentrate on the task at hand. I close off all other windows, and focus on getting those photos resized and uploaded.


This calls attention to the fact that it does take time and energy to post a detailed trip report, and post photos. It looks easy, and it is, but it is time-consuming.

So we should take a moment now and then to thank the folks who have done it.

Like canoeheadted..... :clap:



Barbara

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PostPosted: October 8th, 2008, 5:32 pm 
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Yeah I totally agree with Barb about writing with a text-editor and not in a flaky, unstable, refresh/time-out prone textbox within a webpage rendered by a web-browser.

I don't know how many times I've spent beaucoup time & effort writing something into a textbox in a web-browser as a reply to a forum post or as an email in a gmail webpage, only to get refreshed or timed-out or another webpage grabs the browser's focus and when I go back to the webpage I was writing stuff in, guess what? Yes, it takes me back to that same page I was writing stuff in, but its a brand new version of the page with a sparkling, clean, empty text box, grrr.

Yep, if I'm wrinting anything other than a quick couple lines I do it in Notepad or Wordpad and when I'm finished, cut n' paste it into the webpage. That's good advice. I've learned the hard way --- you don't have to.

:)

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aka Cyberhun, callsign VA7FAB

Mariners must navigate these waters the same way a mouse negotiates a kitchen patrolled by cats: by darting furtively from one hiding place to the next.
"The Golden Spruce", John Vaillant


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PostPosted: July 10th, 2010, 4:56 pm 
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Canoeheadted wrote:

When your dog know what is allowed and not allowed this allows both parties to enjoy the outing (or any interaction). For example, our dogs always have to be within our sight. This allows us to command when needed or read their body language to anticipate problems. When entering different types of terrain or foliage, we will always announce ourselves. (HEY BEAR!) Our dogs are never allowed to chase any animals or wander off from camp.



One way to prevent your dogs harassing wildlife is to leash them. And, interestingly, this is legally required in Manning Park:

"Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or in park buildings. You are responsible for their pets behaviour and must dispose of their excrement."

--http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/ecmanning/#Management


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PostPosted: July 10th, 2010, 10:34 pm 
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
You're absolutely right.

One sad thing is how few parks allow dogs at all. Another one of those few bad apples things.


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