Noire River

CanadaQuebec04 Ottawa
Submitter & Author Information
Route submitted by: 
Vesna
Trip Date : 
Thu, Oct 25, 2012
Additional Route Information
Distance: 
167 km
Duration: 
7 days
Loop Trip: 
No
Portage Information
No. of portages: 
10
Total Portage Distance: 
1625 m
Longest Portage: 
0 m
Difficulty Ratings
River Travel: 
Not applicable
Lake Travel: 
Not applicable
Portaging: 
Not applicable
Remoteness: 
Not applicable
Background Trip Info
Water Levels: 
Low
Route Description
Access to Put-In Information: 

Outfitters: John Perron: The Black River Inn and Outfitter, stay@blackriveroutfitter.com; www.blackriveroutfitter.com; 819-117-5108, Waltham Quebec. In business 3 years, and working hard to build it up. -can camp out back, no charge, or take a room at the Inn $70? Or a Cabin for $90-100 that sleeps 8. -no charge to leave vehicle -canoes available to rent. Nicely outfitted with knee pads, yokes, straps etc. $30/day. Mad River Canoes (ABS) with lots of rocker. -350+tax to km 115-187. Michel Pouliot: Expeditions Riviere Noire, pouliotm@cspo.qu.ca, 819-778-6347 (up to mid June), cell 613-639-2276 – leave a message, there is no cellular service in the area, so he drives out to pick up messages. In business 15 years. -can camp out back, no charge, Or a Cabin for $90-100 that sleeps 8. -no charge to leave vehicle -canoes available to rent that are appropriate for river. -$275 to km 115 Valley Ventures: Don at vent@magma.ca; 613-584-2577; 33861 Hwy 17, Box 115, Deep River, -To Lac St. Patrice: 3 canoes $500.00, 4 canoes $650.00 (trailer required). Then to pick you up will cost $150.00. We would arrange a rendezvous time. -To Forant Creek which will take you directly to the river. This will cost $650.00 for three canoes and $725.00 for four canoes. They go via Black River Inn and just leave your cars there. When you finish the trip they would pick up the canoes only for a cost of $100.00. This will also save paddling Lac St. Patrice. -They do have accommodation here but we don\'t serve meals, however, all the cooking facilities are there so you could do your own. The cost is $30.00 per night per person. There is a fee of $6 to pass through the ZEC Noire – but it usually is paid with the outfitter, and then you get a receipt.

Technical Guide: 

Shuttle from Black River Inn to km 187 on Noire River.
km 183 swifts CBR
km 173 swifts CBR
P 45 m RL around falls a km 171m 171.5 CI 100m CBR
km 150.5 swifts CBR
km 139 CI 50m CBR
km 136 CI tech 450 m CBR (CII tech in medium to high water)
P 85 m RL km 116 "the Wall"-a CII tech 125m (CI 30m, CI 25 m before portage)
km 113 swifts
km 113.5 "Raides McDonald" CI 200m
P 475 RL "Targie" at km 99 (CII 175m or P 75m to CII section)
P 730 RR "Canyon Staircase" km 101 (160m CII to top of a series of ledges (DNR)150m; P 150m; CII 270m with no clear view)
km 97 CII tech 75m
km 96 Ci 35m either side of island
P From Hell 200m to steep drop (bring 100m of rope) to below falls (CI tech 500m), or walk the P From Hell l1340m to end.
P 425m "Rapides de l'Islet (km 91 CI tech to CII "the Drain 120m) to CI-II 450m)
P 17m "Rapides de l'Ours CIV 60m (DNR) to CII Rocks
km 89 CI tech 30m
60m "Hunt Club Rapids" km 69 CII 120m
km 67 CI 75m
km 65 Sur l'tle Rapid
km 45.5 CI Tech 125m "Double Ferry"
P 80m 50:50 Rapids CII 100m at km 46.6
km 44.5 "Tight Right" CII tech 50m
km 44.5 Manitou (no portage noted)
Rapids CII tech to CIII 200m (no portage noted)
km 44 LO and line Jam Rock (CII tech 40m CII bottom 175m)
km 43 CI tech 200m
km 42 "Boulder Raceway" starts - CII and CI to coulder Alley for the to km 30
Swifts to Black River Inn at km 28
Take out

Portages around most rapids, but not all, including some CII tech's.

Some of the class I's become class II tech's under certain conditions.

All portages relatively easy, with the exception of Mountain Chute. The long portage is "from Hell", and the short portage is no fun either-sideways up hill, and then stringing ropes to get you and gear down a very steep drop. Small put in at base of falls, and above 1km of rapids you can't read in advance.

Trip Journal/Log/Report/Diary: 

Day 1 Sat. July 2, 2005

Up at 5:20 a.m. Exhausted after being up a good chunk of the night with Iain (14) and his nightmares after reading Alien. On the road at 6:10, and out of Newmarket by 6:30. Stopped in Maynooth and picked up Sandy (4) a cute little Beaver Bag fanny pack ($4.95) that will be great for him to put his ID and collections in that also included an LED light. The “General Store” always has such great stuff. I hope to get back to pick David up a T-shirt that says “Give those cheeks some colour – Paddle Naked!” – but will he wear it?

It took 4.5 hours to Pembroke, and we had lunch at the Truck Stop. Called home to say bye to the kids only to find out that Iain had no recollection of his nightmare and sleep walking! Only 56 km to Black River Inn (we measured it as 49.5 from Pembroke and 410 km from Newmarket to the Inn). We arrived at 1 p.m., and Ben (our driver) arrived back at 2. We had time for a cup of tea (bag in cup $1.50 ea!) while he loaded both the boats on the top of the comfortable Chevy Suburban. The shuttle was $350 + tax=402.27, including the $75 deposit. The put-in had been changed so many times and it had been debated with both outfitters for so long, that I had finally told John Perron of Black River Inn(owner for 3 years) where I wanted to get to, and then let him figure out if he could get us there (km 115 on Hap Wilson’s map). John Perron decided that we should go to km 108 on the logging road to give us 6 days of paddling, and that it should be close to where we wanted to go.

It was a 2 hour drive exactly to the put-in (4:30pm.), and the Noire is quite narrow at this point, but not claustrophobic at all. Ben had many tales to tell on his way up such as the one about the man from China who had never seen a canoe or tent before who insisted that he was going to take his son for a paddle the Noire. He quit after 2 days and 12 km. He also told us that 2 people had gone down Mnt. Chute by mistake and lived, and a 14 yr old boy who had held onto a rock at the top of Mnt. Chute for 8 hours before the rescue was complete! Ben himself was interesting, as he talked about his life as a lumberjack in the winter months. He also has an 18 month old son who arrived after 20 years of trying.

We paddled 7 km, until 5:20, and then pulled up on a sand bar to see where we were. After having a good look at all of the maps, David pulled out the GPS we had brought for emergencies, and the topo’s, and discovered that we had put in at km 187 on Hap’s map. We were 55 km’s higher than we should have been! We would have to paddle 40 km Sunday (only 13.7 km as the crow flies). But the current was good, 6-7 km/hr, so we would make good time despite meanders.

We had been told that Peter would make tea when ever he got a chance, and he was quick. Had a very small cooking fire ready in minutes, and our cups filled. Most welcome, as was a good swim. Hit the tent at 9 p.m. to the sound of white throated sparrows.

Saw 1 abandoned cabin today.

Day 2 Sun. July 3, 2005

Awake at 5:30, up at 6:30. Heard 6 beavers (or otters) slapping tails and jumping all night. Cool, mist on water and 11 C. Heavy dew, and we had not pegged out the fly. Not happy with our new Tilley Socks – both of us have holes forming at the seams already. I swam immediately. Although there appears to be no bugs on the river, a few black flies found me immediately, and my right eye, side of face, neck and shoulders were swollen already as usual. Fortunately Peter had 2 tea bags for me to tie on with my handy Cheryl’s-eye-is-going-to-swell-bandana. Eggs and bacon breakfast, and once again, no bugs!

I was clumsy with my 1-D vision, and a little slow helping to pack up, so we did not get on the water until 8:55 a.m. Peter and Mary very self sufficient and pack light. A definite stress reliever. The meanders were long and sweeping, and the terrain changed every half hour. Sand dunes, sand backs, clay banks, poplar, pine (balsam, red, white, jack etc.), birch, blue and other spruce and hardly any Labrador tea. A few swifts and a C1 to break up the monotony. Really, for someone who hates meanders, I was quite enjoying these long sweeping ones. I had been told that there would be no view on this river, but sometimes you can see 400m to 1km, and the hills are lovely to see. No drag-overs, lining, dragging or beaver dams. 1 short 45m portage around a falls that was easy – just dragged the canoes over. A few spars and strainers, but never a problem getting around them. Not a hard day- current is pretty consistent of 5-7.5 km/hr (the GPS does have another purpose!). Had a nice 50 min lunch on a sand bar, and then a swim. Pulled off at 4 p.m. – warm at 29 C and a bit of a head wind- after doing 30 km, as we found a lovely site at km 150 (Hap’s maps). The same pure white, soft, Caribbean sand, but also an upper bench in a red pine forest with 3 nice tent pads. A very relaxing day. Saw 1 eagle, mergansers, blue heron and ravens.

This site was also a nice place to swim. Could start at one side of the point, and quickly drift around to other side. The swift/CI had rocks you could hold on to so that you could “do you laundry” by letting the current flow through your clothes. Very warm evening. David make a great beef stew with a supper fantastic flaky crusted apple pie. Note: instant pie crust from Bulk Barn really worked well.

Day 3 Monday July 4

12 C when we got up at 6:30 a.m. My right eye still partially swollen (2 tea bag day again). Gorgeous blue sky morning. Alpen with dried blueberries is even better than with dried strawberries. Packed and on the water by 8:15 without rushing. Played in swift and swam, and then practiced back ferries. Left site at 8:40. The river continues to surprise us with different terrain all day. The straight parts are actually boring compared to the meanders. Same good current carried us along. See lots of animal tracks (moose and calf, heron, otter, beaver, racoon), but no animals. Stopped several times for a swim off of different dunes. A very relaxing 35 km, and we could easily go on another 10 km. We tried to get into Hap’s “marsh worth exploring”, at km 142but could not get into it.

We had lunch on a massive dune after the C1 at the river from St. Patrice. Rather, it was not a C1 today at this level, and it was very technical Very deep here, and had a good swim in cooler waters. It has to be 32+C today! . We listened to logging sounds and helicopters for part of the afternoon. We saw 1 cabin, 2 “no—bridges” and 1 bridge. No blueberries or raspberries to Peter’s disappointment, 1 grouse, mergansers. We stopped at 3:40 at km 118 at an excellent site. 2 acres of dune, and then red pine forest. Could fit 20 tents, with 10 back at the forest. The bugs were up a bit, and we spent the evening in the bug tent. A long way to walk across the sand to the water (and the deer and horse flies out when we swam). David cooked pancakes, and then hung them in a big pine to dry. Peter and Mary are well travelled. We enjoying listening to their stories The Green River in Utah is definitely worth investigating. The wind finally came up at 9:15, and we headed for the tents expecting rain. It began to rain at 10 p.m. or so.

Day 4 Tues. July 5

Temp only dropped to 22 C and it was very humid all night long. The liquid sunshine continued until 3 p.m. today. Rain and bugs driving on the tent all night long. Very hot and sticky. Woke at 5:30, 6:30, and then finally had to get up at 7:30. Still a steady rain. The bugs bad (or should I say about normal for this time of year?), so we were all glad for the shelter of the bug tent for breakfast. On the water by 9:30 a.m. The pancake breakfast with maple sugar syrup was very good (what a great idea from myccr.com). Everyone helping each other to get going. A real down pour for the next several hours. The volume of water up even more. The river was a bit slower today, and much deeper in spots. There was less sand dunes, and lots of red pine.

Did not run “the Wall”. A tree was sticking out from the wall, and the waves were 4’ high. Curler at the top which could flip you, and then 2 monster haystacks sure to fill you, just as you are trying to manoeuvre to avoid the tree and the wall. All while my glasses where covered with driving rain.

We stopped for lunch at a beach and found a hunt camp and a road hidden behind. The rain stopped long enough for us to have Mexican bread with sausage and cheese for lunch. Boy, David makes great bread!

We ran MacDonald Rapids by the book. The rain started again just as we got to Targie. The rocks where too slippery to line the top. As much as I wanted to run the Toilet Bowl, it did not make sense with the huge cross wave and hole that continued to grow as the volume of water built. We put in just below, and ran down the left. Lined a bit, and then ran the class II tech at the bottom in our boat and M & P’s boat too. Checked out the lower run from the island and the water was huge.

We set up on a nice 3 tent site at the bottom (and room for the bug tent too) with a view of the last part of the drop and dried everything out. No bugs and the temp dropped to 16 C. Hundred of blueberries (and Peter was happy) on the portage trail. No sign of bears anywhere. Picked 2.5 cups and dumped them all into pancakes for breakfast. Mary cooked a lovely turkey curry for supper. The appetizers were dried zucchini that had 1 side dipped in celery salt and cumin seeds. Yummy. Chocolate and dried cherries for dessert – Reminder: the kids would love cherries with Nutella dip.

There was a deep ongoing thumping that we finally figured out to be a huge rock in the river rocking back and forth.

Day 5 Wed. July 6

Woke to a cool (fleece) morning. Everything drenched in dew/condensation. No point in drying out. Quick pack up, and everyone had blueberries with a bit of pancakes for breakfast with maple sugar syrup. Another gorgeous day!

Ferried over to the island and had a look at the rest of rapid. Could finally see the line – although big holes at this water level in Hap’s route that could keep the canoe. Short paddle to lovely Canyon Staircase. Clear blue sky, light head wind and 25 C with no humidity, a very few bugs. Carried gear to the end and then spent a lot of time scouting, trying to see around corners.

Turned out we spent more time than it deserved as it was an easy run. A little unnerving when we could not see parts at all, but could see the roots of a tree in mid-stream. Ran to the lip of the first drop in a CI tech, and then carried to the bottom of the cascades. CII in centre went fine, but chose to line the bottom – big log in the way, and could not see the ledge clearly on the left. Some swifts and a CI, and finally had to have lunch on a sand bar – first firm sand we saw. A bit of a shock to round a corner and see a lovely grey cottage on a manicured lawn that included a decorative fire hydrant. It was a police station! It flew the Ont. Flag, the Quebec Flag, and a Canada flag. We were surprised to observe the word Police was much larger that Surrete. What are they here for? The loggers?

A fun CII followed and a CI (rapid # 30 – could go RR or RL of island easily). On to Mountain Chute. We stopped at the very nice campsite (5’ steep takeout though) and scouted top. CI and CII as stated, and then took out at marked portage. Could have lined or run right to top of drop, but would be on fairly steep rock and in the current. “Portage from Hell” even on the short route. Steep with side-slopes, and tight manoeuvring between trees. The crevasse marked on Hap’s map is 80% of the way, not 50%. Rigged up a line and caribiner’s and slid the gear and boats down. Used 60' of line and more to tie off. Good 450 slope, and a 60’ drop. Put in at bottom of chute – tight and it would be hard to have more than 2 canoes at the bottom at a time. Took 3 hours from lunch spot to finally re-loading boats.

The canyon is so beautiful! Had fun running CI’s and CII – several hundred meters of huge waves, and then quickly into CI and into Rapids d’Islet. Log jam is gone and can RR if wish. Headed right to campsite down another CI on Rapid d’Islet. Nice site, but nowhere to swim. This site was very close to the road, and we could hear trucks going by all night long. The best tent pads were stretched out 100m down the trail. 1 site up the hill and to left, 2 by fire pit (both sloping), 2 on trail, and 1 at put in part way down. I walked right to the end of the portage trail (there are many trails along the way) and back, and the final put in is down a steep 20’ steep loose sand bank. Hap doesn’t include this on his map, and round trip it took me about 45 min. Massive souse hole at the class IV just above where we put in, and river not runnable on RR. Portage closer to 350 or 400m.

We spent several hours drying gear out, and repaired holes in the Sealine pack (must of scraped it coming down the ropes – must remember to put ropes higher up the tree). Fantastic evening, no bugs, but all are exhausted even though we only covered 10 km.

Day 6 Thurs. July 7

David up at 1:30 a.m. and he could clearly see the Big Dipper. Awake at 5:30 (trucks going by all night – road is 200m away), so ear plugs and nightshade until 7 a.m. Got the tent packed and come out to greet everyone having their morning cuppa. Everyone a little grumpy and tired after yesterday, and last night with the trucks. We sort it all out with our respective partners and leave happy.

Began portage at 8:50. Have fun in the continuous CI and CII. Learning to watch out for the rocky end to the bottom of every rapid – that is where you are most likely to get pinned. Short portage to R’apid L’Ours –The Bear. We had been warned that you are more likely to die at this drop than Canyon Chute. Can’t see that myself, but nasty, shorter and smaller drop. Take out in the current at a single tent site. Interesting but short portage. Dragged the canoe first 50m to the first put-in, after that the portage is rocky with some downed trees etc.

David and I put in at the bottom of the first drop, and then lined a few meters and ran down RL. Did well until the first big rock sticking 3’ out of the water. I lost my paddle briefly between 2 rocks and we went right up the next rock, slid off of it, miss the eddy (too early), and then hit the next bolder before getting out into the eddy safely. What a comedy of errors! Gave P & M a scare, but we were fine. Ran again in their boat, and it was perfect, although their Appalachian does not turn nearly as well as the Madawaska.

From the eddy we lined 20 m then were able to run the rest. We saw a few cabins, but none were occupied. Had lunch on a “medium rated” site, and then a lovely 100m float down the river (swim) 1 hour later. Medium sites do not seem to have the upper benches that can take tents. In 1.5 hours only made 270 m progress towards our next site by the GPS. We were back into lovely meanders. See a few more cabins, but much nicer. Stopped at one and it had a new cedar lined outhouse and fancy outdoor shower! Pulled in at the last “E” site at km 70. Another massive sand dune. Large and lots of room for tents. Hot! Hot! Hot! And the bugs out big time. We camped in meadow off of the beach before the pine forest. Mary made Tabouli on hummus (with dried mango’s and fresh mint, peppers, ginger and sun-dried tomatoes). Chocolate for dessert. All sit in shade of big bush on beach. Bed early with promise to get up to see the stars.

Day 7 Friday July 8.

8 C when we woke this morning after an excellent night’s sleep. P and M got up to look at the stars at 11 p.m. but no-seeums quickly drove them back in. Said the stars were lovely. Peter up at 6 and we followed at along 6:30 with Mary. Bugs got us packing quickly and on the water at 8:30. Tenacious horse flies stayed with us all day, did not really bite, but were very annoying. Paddled around first meander and ended up 10’ from the river where we started! No sign of moose, although there were many cut off meanders and marshes to check out. Younger meanders here. Swimming would not be as nice. Could hear Hunt Club Rapid from our start point, but it took a long time to get to it. Easy run – by the book. Nice site at Sur l’tl (point just before it) not on Hap’s map. Did not see anything to make this area interesting. Saw turkey vultures for the first time, a big hawk, Canada geese, and hear a grouse. Saw red-tailed squirrels too.

Arrived at Double Ferry at 11:50 – easy run and pulled in at 50:50 at 12:02. Nice site. Still lots of deer flies and mosquitoes – a little less than normal, but still irritating. Big water. Set up camp and napped. Such a relaxing vacation! John Blaise’s topo’s indicated that they had gone from Rapides de l’Islet 3 kms above 50:50 in one day, but why? Must remember to ask him.

David and I ran the suggested line. Such fun! Big waves at the bottom reminded me less of Wavy Rapid on the Missinaibi and more of Coliseum on the Ottawa. Right over our heads. We ran it 3 times in our canoe and once in Mary and Peter’s before the deer flies caused us t o cover up. Mary practiced with the throw bag and Peter went around in the eddy and flushed down stream to be rescued. We managed to wash all of the sand out of the canoes.

The temperature dropped and the bugs left until after dinner. We combined meals and had potato soup, couscous with roasted red peppers, turkey veg. curry, and the apple and apricot fritters (tortillas/pitas stuffed with fruit, maple sugar, cinnamon and marg. David and Mary prepared fruit pancakes for breakfast with the left over fruit. Dried the pancakes on the branches on the wood pile. First person we had seen in 7 days was across the river at the Hunt Club cutting the grass! From the cloud of dust coming up from the lawn mowers, we didn’t think he had much of a lawn to cut!

Day 8 Sat. July 9

Rain in the night? No, sap from the pine trees. Site very open, but all red pine by rapid, and then mixed deciduous behind. Did not see any poison ivy by thunder box as I had been advised. Mary up at 6 a.m. Everyone else followed at 6:30. Pancakes excellent (even the one cooked in the curry pan). As humidity went up, so did the bugs. Peter and Marry decided not to run 50:50, so we were on our way at 8:30 after some ferry’s. The river was pretty straight here. Nice paddle to Tight Right, and ran it as stated, no problems. Looked Manitou over, and could not run by the book. Ran down R side of tongue and eddied right. Ferried across and then ran down left with no problems. No clear tongue at Jam Rock as water was all flowing RL and then nicely to RR around Jam Rock. If only we could have got around all the rocks sticking up at the top. We swam (and picked up our first rapid leeches) after lining (lower water would be a lift over) 10m. From km 50-27 take-out was a joy! Continuous 7-10.5 km/hr current. We basically floated and steered around rocks and gravel bars. Enjoyed the CI’s and CII. The valley here is lovely and very “Dumoinish”. Had lunch at “excellent site” RR at km 38. Very small and buggy – only room for 2 tents tops. There was a bush road running down most of the right side. We saw John coming by in his truck and he had dropped off 7 canoes. He called out to us that we would be catching up to 18 people soon. He checked that we were okay – he was quite worried about us. Thought that we put in further down, so we should have been out sooner, and the emergency arrangement was that we would be back by Sat. night or he would report us missing.

The 7 canoes from Black River Inn provided us with much enjoyment. All were rookies with beers and coolers, trying to figure out how to get down this Boulder Alley. We retrieved lost paddles and showed them the way before leaving all behind and headed off for a swim down stream. On that particular island we found poison ivy! The rookies caught up with us after we had taken out. Canoes dumping and paddles floating down stream even at the take-out!

Took out at 1:30 and on the road at 2:20. Hit a rock 3 km down the road and had a flat tire, so did not hit Pembroke until 3:30. Found out that Sierra Design at Foymount is open 7 days a week, but closes at 5 p.m., and the Foymount Tea Shop closes at 4 p.m. Peter waited patiently, and was disappointed to have missed his tea. I rushed and was not able to make all my purchases before they closed. Said goodbye to our fine paddle mates and head home. Stopped for dinner at Chan’s Chinese food in Bancroft – pretty good, and home by 9:30.

Decided that in a few years it would be great to come back and do this river again and continue all the way down to the Waltham Dam (Waltham and Waltham Station seem to be the same place). Ozzie (an acquaintance who ran the river in May) told us that is where they saw the most wildlife. David and I disagreed about the need for 1 more day up top.

Maps Required
Topo Maps (1:50,000): 
Topo maps Lac St-Patrice 31 K/6, 31 K/7, 31/K2, Fort Coulonge 31 F/5
Other Maps: 
Note that there is a difference in the distances marked on Hap Wilson’s Maps in Rivers of the Upper Ottawa Valley, and the Federation Quebecoise du canot et du kayak, Inc. maps.
Other
Special Comments: 

Summary

Spring water levels and dropping.

Day 1 Road Access point 108 (River put in on Hap’s map was km 187); Paddled 7 km to km 180 and camped on a sand bank. Could get into forest to dig cat hole at every site, and there were thunderboxes at and 50:50.
NOTE: Could have gone farther as there is a sand bank to camp on at practically every bend in the river.

Day 2 From km 180 to 150 – Excellent site marked on Hap’s map. 3 tent pads and quite nice.

Day 3 from km 150 to 118. – Excellent site (2 acre sand dune fronting a red pine forest) marked on Hap’s map. Lots of tent pads at the edge of the forest.

Day 4 from km 118-100 (Rapides de la Targie). Stopped here because we did not want to risk having to do the next section if the next site was full and when people where tired. In retrospect, if we had stopped at the nice site at the head of Mt. Chute it would have meant everyone was totally fresh for the hard portage. Thunderbox not maintained.

Day 5 Km 100-90 (Rapides de l’Islet). Canyon Staircase and Mountain Cute. Tough portage at Mountain Chute. Need ropes and caribiners to line packs down steep slope.

Day 6 From Km 90-71 We camped in the meadow off of the beach but before the pine forest on the back of a big dune. Long trail to walk along.

Day 7 Km 71 to 52. (50:50 Hunt Club Rapid). Nice large site, room for several tents. Thunderbox is maintained. Right across the river from the Hunt Club. Had to listen to the grass being cut.

Day 8 Km 52- 28 (Black River Inn). All class I and II with swifts between. Kilometres of fun!

Note that there is a difference in the distances marked on Hap Wilson’s Maps in Rivers of the Upper Ottawa Valley, and the Federation Quebecoise du canot et du kayak, Inc. maps.

Ref: Topo maps Lac St-Patrice 31 K/6, 31 K/7, 31/K2, Fort Coulonge 31 F/5
Outfitters:

John Perron: The Black River Inn and Outfitter, stay@blackriveroutfitter.com; www.blackriveroutfitter.com; 819-117-5108, Waltham Quebec. In business 3 years, and working hard to build it up.
-can camp out back, no charge, or take a room at the Inn $70? Or a Cabin for $90-100 that sleeps 8.
-no charge to leave vehicle
-canoes available to rent. Nicely outfitted with knee pads, yokes, straps etc. $30/day. Mad River Canoes (ABS) with lots of rocker.
-350+tax to km 115-187.

Michel Pouliot: Expeditions Riviere Noire, pouliotm@cspo.qu.ca, 819-778-6347 (up to mid June), cell 613-639-2276 – leave a message, there is no cellular service in the area, so he drives out to pick up messages. In business 15 years.
-can camp out back, no charge, Or a Cabin for $90-100 that sleeps 8.
-no charge to leave vehicle
-canoes available to rent that are appropriate for river.
-$275 to km 115
Valley Ventures: Don at vent@magma.ca; 613-584-2577; 33861 Hwy 17, Box 115, Deep River,
-To Lac St. Patrice: 3 canoes $500.00, 4 canoes $650.00 (trailer required). Then to pick you up will cost $150.00. We would arrange a rendezvous time.
-To Forant Creek which will take you directly to the river. This will cost $650.00 for three canoes and $725.00 for four canoes. They go via Black River Inn and just leave your cars there. When you finish the trip they would pick up the canoes only for a cost of $100.00. This will also save paddling Lac St. Patrice.
-They do have accommodation here but we don't serve meals, however, all the
cooking facilities are there so you could do your own. The cost is $30.00 per night per person.

There is a fee of $6 to pass through the ZEC Noire – but it usually is paid with the outfitter, and then you get a receipt.

In Low water the last 28km would be a bump, grind and drag.