View topic - Looking for route - with lots of snow capped mountains

It is currently April 4th, 2020, 4:36 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: December 26th, 2007, 9:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 28th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 57
Location: Guelph, Ontario Canada
I did the upper and lower Stikine - had great weather and the lower was fantastic as far as mountain views and glaciers go.

Can anyone suggest another route in BC that would be similar?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 26th, 2007, 10:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2075
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
MadTripper wrote:
I did the upper and lower Stikine - had great weather and the lower was fantastic as far as mountain views and glaciers go.

Can anyone suggest another route in BC that would be similar?


If you go in the spring, it's difficult to find places in BC where there is no snow left on the mountains. Even on the coast. Bowron Lakes has soaring peaks and glacier views, though not quite up to the Stikine.

_________________
In Memory of Robert Dziekanski


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 27th, 2007, 8:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 20th, 2007, 10:46 pm
Posts: 78
Location: Smithers
Not as remote or long (unless starting near the headwaters!), but the Skeena River has some great scenery. The mid section from Hazelton to Terrace is narrow valleyed with large mountains, and the lower braided section (Terrace to Rupert) is stunning, like a Norwegian Fiord with granite halfdomes.

_________________
Cheers,

Aaron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 27th, 2007, 10:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1155
Location: seattle, Washington USA
The Gataga has some snow capped peaks of the Rockies, and there are views of peaks on the first half of the Dease.

AaronT, what is the upper Skeena like? I've looked at the Nass a couple of times, but apparently only the lower section below the Cassiar Highway is doable.

Erich


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 27th, 2007, 11:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 11th, 2007, 11:55 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Nanaimo, BC
Do you like lake paddling?

I did a trip to Chilko Lake last summer. Wow! It is absolutley stunning, surrounded by rugged, glaciated peaks. Be careful with the wind.

Atlin Lake would probably be pretty similar to Chilko Lake (I haven't been there), and there is a stretch of the southern end of the lake where the terminus of major icefields come near (into?) the lake.

River paddles, the upper Fraser River (upstream of Prince George) goes along the Rocky Mountain trench and is flanked by mountains. The upper Columbia is also through the mountains, but also goes through more inhabitated areas.

I don't know how difficult the Taku is, but it is very similar in terms of surroundings, to the Stikine.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 28th, 2007, 12:44 am 
Offline

Joined: April 15th, 2003, 9:19 am
Posts: 114
Location: Whitehorse, Yukon
I haven't done it, but from what I've heard, the Taku River in Northern BC might be what you are looking for. Similar to the Lower Stikine, I think, as Island Dave suggests. Fly in from Atlin BC, and paddle out to Juneau, Alaska area - although you may want to get a pick up as there is more ocean paddling than on the Stikine. I don't think the paddling is too tough - class II maybe.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2008, 1:29 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 20th, 2007, 10:46 pm
Posts: 78
Location: Smithers
"what is the upper Skeena like?"

I have not paddled it but many friends have. It sounds like great white water rafting or kayaking to kayak class IV, and can be big water depending on levels. Lots of combo options too, like running the Sustut first (IV-V) then the Skeena. I would guess the Upper Skeena would be feasible for a very solid solo canoeist, but might be out of range for tandem (especially loaded, perhaps with raft support?).

_________________
Cheers,

Aaron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2008, 3:30 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 20th, 2007, 10:46 pm
Posts: 78
Location: Smithers
Also regarding the upper Nass, it has also been run in kayak, but has class 5 drops which were mostly portaged due to loaded boats and remoteness. I have worked a little up there and there are some stunning small volume canyons with lovely small waterwalls.

_________________
Cheers,

Aaron


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 26th, 2008, 1:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: January 22nd, 2008, 11:18 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Ottawa
If you haven't done the Bowron Lakes I'd aim for that spot. Beautiful alpine mountains surround you through most of the trip with glaciers every km or so coming down most valleys and touching the waters. AMAZING fishing for Charrs and Rainbows, like shooting ducks in barrels. However barbless only, so you'll loose 2 for every 1 you bring in. Portages are the easiest I've ever seen - akin to dirt roads in width and obstructions. Most people we met there used dollies, but over the shoulders was way faster. Trails were muddy and the days drizzly, but the worst negative I'd say are the campsites. Absolutely dreadful - they are all group campsites and each have a commununal cabin or roofed shelter where you do your cooking. Not my thing, but I guess that's the way it is there. Wasn't a huge issue though, most of the time we were on the water fishing til dark and you'd pack up as soon as breakie is over to head ever onwards in the morning. Again, the fishing was what dreams are made of, I'd go back in a sec.

_________________
><((((;º< J


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 27th, 2008, 12:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2075
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
SMolson wrote:
... the worst negative I'd say are the campsites. Absolutely dreadful - they are all group campsites and each have a commununal cabin or roofed shelter where you do your cooking.


There are plenty of very small campsites that usually you can have to yourself. I believe the maps provided to trippers list the number of sites per campsite, so it's not hard to find them. But of course they're not in the nicest places. You can also go after mid-Sept. and practically have the place to yourself. Almost no one starts after Sept.. 20.

Given that the park is now patrolled by a private contractor who probably has better things to do than spend the day searching for people, it would be easy to sneak-camp as long as you pulled your boat into the woods and didn't have fires. And didn't make a mess, of course.

_________________
In Memory of Robert Dziekanski


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 29th, 2008, 11:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: January 22nd, 2008, 11:18 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Ottawa
Hey SG,

I miss BC, and when we return that first inland canoe trip will be back to the Bowron Lakes. Ah well, have to settle for Land-O-Lakes and the amazing fishery out this way while I bide my time.

_________________
><((((;º< J


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 30th, 2008, 12:33 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2075
Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
Last weekend I discovered that an aquaintance has done the Bowron Lakes with his family every year for the last 10 years!

_________________
In Memory of Robert Dziekanski


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 30th, 2008, 12:34 am 
Offline

Joined: October 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1155
Location: seattle, Washington USA
When I first paddled Bowron, I was sixteen(what were my parents thinking?), we had two weeks worth of supplies, we took the family sedan, and my friend was somewhat less than that by the end. Still, I remember it fondly. The portages were ankle deep in mud, the rain incessant, and the day spent building and sailing a catamaran with a couple of other guys, enjoyable. In the early seventies, Bowron still had some degree of frontierness, especially to sixteen year olds. The bear scat, the porky quills in the privies, and the moose in the marsh all made it a great experience.

Erich


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group