View topic - Suggestions for 5-7 day trip in Hawk Junction area

It is currently May 9th, 2021, 11:42 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 29 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: October 25th, 2012, 3:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 23rd, 2012, 9:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Ohio
pknoerr wrote:
I've done two trips in that area. The first was the Upper Missinaibi from Hawk Junction to Mattice. It's around 13 days. You could take out at Peterbell, that's about 5-6 days according to my memory, along with catching the CN from Peterbell to Sudbury and a bit of a car shuttle from Sudbury back to Hawk Junction. Here's a trip report

http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=108&t=35630

Here's another option. We did a loop trip via the Budd Car from the village of Missinaibie into Bolkow Lake and down the Little Missinaibi to Missinaibi Lake and back to the village of Missinaibi. I think that was 6 days. You could start from Hawk River and add on the Dog Lake and Manitowik lake segments in the Michipicoten drainage, stop at Missinaibie and catch the train. This adds logistic issues and a couple days or lake paddling. Little Missinaibie is a worthwhile visit to see the pictographs, plus you might get a chance to visit Fairy Point on Missinaibi Lake if the wind is down. Here is that trip report as well.

http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=108&t=36105

PK


Awesome, thanks for the suggestions. I've actually been looking into starting up north and ending in Hawk...I'll post the specifics tomorrow since I left the maps i printed at work, but i think it's a do-able route. Takes us via several lakes including Dog, and it seems theres tributaries and things that will take us all the way into Hawk.

chicopeesnowshoe wrote:
If you decide to do a river, the Goulais might interest you. In the upper part it winds around a bit, like all of them seem to. There really is not a high level of challenge, but you often have to watch the current in many places, especially if you do it earlier in the year. There is a waterfall not far from Searchmont that could surprise you. It's quite a drop. That's the only real portage . There are a couple of lift-overs. Campsites are fairly frequent, and they're free. You could take 4-5 days for the trip all the way to Superior from Ranger Lake.

The Sand starts at the railway to the east of Hawk Junction. Ther are 26 portages, and if the wtaer is down , you'll have to walk the bulk of them. I found the Goulais much more enjoyable.


The Goulais is a great option it seems; only concern is will it be wilderness enough- but with it being all of our first times, that may not be so terrible. As long as it's not a "constantly running into families along the way" type thing, i would think it would be suitable. What is your experience as far as that is concerned? Does the Goulais route offer at least somewhat of a wilderness feel?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 7:12 am 
Offline

Joined: October 23rd, 2012, 9:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Ohio
Okay, looking at the maps i was able to print out, I'm currently weighing two options:

Option 1- Begin at Wabatongushi Lake, follow lakes/rivers to finish in Hawk Junction. Benefit I see here is it seems to be more "wilderness", and from what the maps indicate there is actually a water route to make it the entirety. Looks like Wabatongishi lake to Dog Lake to Manitowik Lake...seems to be tributaries between all of these, so I would think it feasible. Any experienced guys here know if this is not the case? In addition, the rail goes through Hawk; could drive to Hawk and get on the train north, was thinking of getting off in Hilda (is this actually a town or just the name of a station?) or just north of there at the 210 mile mark of the rail. Any suggestions here? Would think that trip to be long enough, as it seems to be a fairly lengthy distance.

Option 2-
As discussed, an alternative could be to do the Goulais from Searchmont to Superior. Seems to be (as chicopeesnowshoe mentioned) a decent 4-6 day trip, with free camping and frequent sites along the way. May be a better option for us as "rookies". Downside(s) are the fact that it's not overly secluded, as it seems to run along the main highway route. In addition, the ssue there would be how we get from our end at Superior back to our car in Searchmont. Seems like a long drive back, would an outfitter in Searchmont be willing to come pick us up that far from Searchmont? Any experience/recommendations welcome.

Thanks again for all the help guys, your insight and experience is invaluable.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 8:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3731
Location: Grand Haven, Michigan U.S.A.
Your 1st option is doable using the ACR to accomplish your shuttle. Allan has launched from Wabatong to access the Missinaibi. When we were on the train for our Upper Missinaibi trip we had two guys get off on Wabatong and we launched from Hawk Junction the same day. We were about a half day ahead of them, until we took a 1/2 day break on the river. So I'd say it's maybe 2 to 2.5 days on Lake Wabatonguishi to Dog Lake, and then 1.5-2 days down the Michipicoten to Hawk Junction. The trip is entirely on relatively big lakes, so you can modify your path through the lakes enough to kill time or take the shortest route if you need to make some time up. The biggest issue with your schedule will likely be wind. It will be wilderness, but you will see people in the summer. There are a fair number of fishing boats going out from Missinaibi onto Dog Lake. I can't tell you up on Wabatonguishi (as I've not been there, but I doubt you'll see nobody as we saw fishermen around that whole area.

The ACR doesn't require a station for a stop. Talk to the conductor when you get on the train, and they will drop you off at mile markers along the route based on locations on your topo map.

PK


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 10:18 am 
Offline

Joined: October 23rd, 2012, 9:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Ohio
pknoerr wrote:
Your 1st option is doable using the ACR to accomplish your shuttle. Allan has launched from Wabatong to access the Missinaibi. When we were on the train for our Upper Missinaibi trip we had two guys get off on Wabatong and we launched from Hawk Junction the same day. We were about a half day ahead of them, until we took a 1/2 day break on the river. So I'd say it's maybe 2 to 2.5 days on Lake Wabatonguishi to Dog Lake, and then 1.5-2 days down the Michipicoten to Hawk Junction. The trip is entirely on relatively big lakes, so you can modify your path through the lakes enough to kill time or take the shortest route if you need to make some time up. The biggest issue with your schedule will likely be wind. It will be wilderness, but you will see people in the summer. There are a fair number of fishing boats going out from Missinaibi onto Dog Lake. I can't tell you up on Wabatonguishi (as I've not been there, but I doubt you'll see nobody as we saw fishermen around that whole area.

The ACR doesn't require a station for a stop. Talk to the conductor when you get on the train, and they will drop you off at mile markers along the route based on locations on your topo map.

PK


Thanks PK! That sounds like a pretty good time. Does the fact that it's on big lakes take away from the experience at all? I guess I had an image in my head of more river oriented travel, i.e. Deliverance (ha!)...though assuming it's safe/reasonable, I suppose canoeing across large lakes could also be fun. Really appreciate the insight. Seems lie it would be pretty easy to arrange shuttle for that trip; for that reason it has a slight edge over the Goulais trip.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 11:57 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3731
Location: Grand Haven, Michigan U.S.A.
Once, again I've never paddled Wabatongushi. Dog Lake is a pretty good sized lake. I've paddled on Dog Lake twice and both times it was windy. Once we had to pull off the lake because the waves were big enough to make a few folks pretty nervous about swamping, and making forward progress excrutiatingly slow. I've talked with other canoe parties that have been blown off Dog Lake as well.

I went back to my archived maps of Wabatongushi, and there are narrow passages but there is a fair amount of lake that is well over a mile wide. Take a look at the map scale and compare it to the size of the lake. Dog is a formidible lake, and Manitowik is long and oriented NE-SW to match the predominant wind direction.

As to lakes over rivers. Most longer tripping involves some of each, and I enjoy each as part of my tripping experience. Personally, I think the lakes are often more challenging that the rivers, because of the wind driven waves and the lack of current. It's usually alot more fun and less physically taxing running chutes.

PK


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 12:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 23rd, 2012, 9:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Ohio
pknoerr wrote:
Once, again I've never paddled Wabatongushi. Dog Lake is a pretty good sized lake. I've paddled on Dog Lake twice and both times it was windy. Once we had to pull off the lake because the waves were big enough to make a few folks pretty nervous about swamping, and making forward progress excrutiatingly slow. I've talked with other canoe parties that have been blown off Dog Lake as well.

I went back to my archived maps of Wabatongushi, and there are narrow passages but there is a fair amount of lake that is well over a mile wide. Take a look at the map scale and compare it to the size of the lake. Dog is a formidible lake, and Manitowik is long and oriented NE-SW to match the predominant wind direction.

As to lakes over rivers. Most longer tripping involves some of each, and I enjoy each as part of my tripping experience. Personally, I think the lakes are often more challenging that the rivers, because of the wind driven waves and the lack of current. It's usually alot more fun and less physically taxing running chutes.

PK


Would you happen to have links to the map resources you're using? the best I have come up with is a largely undetailed map; only enough to gauge rough size. Seems fro your analysis that Dog lake may be a bit over our heads as first time lake canoers. Our only experience at this point is in local rivers.

I've had some trouble finding good maps online though, aside from those provided earlier in this thread- do you have any recommendations on good map resources (even if it means ordering some)?

This is the one i found (and have been referencing) on my own. Been using map 12.

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/travel ... xpdf.shtml


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 2:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 6th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 42
Location: Waterloo, Ontario Canada
When I went through there I was only 45 so I could maintain a pretty decent pace and I have completed it up to Moosonee. From Hawk up to the portage over the height of land into the Missinabi it is almost all lake paddling so current is not a problem. From the height of land down to Peterbell it is all down hill. You can get on the rail from Peterbell to Sudbury but you will have a long shuttle to worry about. If you can go to Oba and catch the train south it will take you right back to your car. When I went through campsites were not a problem, but I am kind of bushy and any flat spot will do (I don't necessarily have supper or breakfast where I sleep).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 2:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 3rd, 2004, 10:51 am
Posts: 282
Location: Aurora (Borealis)
Here's the online map resource I use. The images are scans of the standard 1:50,000 Canadian topo maps as TIF images, which are quite large file sizes. But if your computer can handle them they should viewable and zoomable if you have a graphics program that can open TIFs (most of them can).

The maps are available for download here:

http://ftp2.cits.rncan.gc.ca/pub/canmatrix/50k_300dpi/

The map including Hawk Junction (for example) is called 42C2. Click the number 42 on the first page, then C on the next page, then 42c02 on the final page, which will download the zipped file of the map.

Assuming you're able to view and zoom into the map, in the lower right-hand corner of each map is an index indicating the numbers of adjoining maps, which you can download in the same way if you need them.

There's also a main zoomable index on this page:

http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/topo/map

Maybe it goes without saying, but it's essential to consult all the info you can find on canoeing in the specific area you're hoping to travel and very seriously evaluate the experience and abilities of the members of your party.

Also, if you're not residents of Canada there will be nightly camping fees involved. (might be some anyway depending on where you go -- there really are countless options).

-JF -


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 3:12 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3731
Location: Grand Haven, Michigan U.S.A.
I seriously doubt that this trip is above your heads in any way. It's all lake paddling, and only requires you to know when to get off if the waves get too big. We've paddled for maybe 30 days within that area on a couple trips, and only spent 1/2 of 1 day off the water.

I use the Canadian topo maps at http://ftp2.cits.rncan.gc.ca/pub/canmatrix/50k_300dpi/. They are plenty detailed for all the tripping up there. I did also use Hap Wilson's "Missinaibi- Journey to the Northern Sky book for part of the trip as we wanted to know about the rapids downriver on the Missinaibi. That book is only of use to you on your route when you get to Dog Lake, but finding portages based on topos isn't too hard either.

PK


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 4:03 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3091
Location: Milton
Just a heads up with the floods they just had this past week (over 1 metre of rain or about 44 inches of it , yikes)
Hwy 17 is closed because of 4 lanes washed out.
There will be some serious changes in some watersheds.
So some new info may be needed and it will be a little slow in coming since it is the end of season.
I imagine the lake systems should be okay. There is one ccr member here who lives in Wawa and is a retired parks employee, he should be able to come up with some info.
J cooper, if he does not come one board you can send him a pm thorugh this thread.
http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtop ... 07&t=40507
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2012, 4:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 23rd, 2012, 9:05 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Ohio
man, thanks guys! So much information to review; I appreciate it. Will take a look at all that has been provided, and consult with my guys to see their preferences; will keep updating as necessary. Any other info in the interim is awesome too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 9th, 2012, 10:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 2nd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 135
Location: Dekalb, Illinois USA
One suggestion not mentioned yet is to take the ACR from the Sault to Frater and do the Sand River to Lake Superior. Kevin Callan has described this route and its doable in 5 days and would be a wilderness trip. You could also drive to Lake Superior PP and begin the trip there going through a few lakes. Just my 2 cents. You would need to either have your car parked at the take out or transportation back to the Sault. Jerry G


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 10th, 2012, 9:47 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3091
Location: Milton
Naturally Superior runs a shuttle service if you need it, but you still have to load your gear in the Sault and then drive up to the park.
I think there is also someone in Montreal Harbour that does it also, and that you can find out through the Montreal Harbour facebook page.
Lots of options though.
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: April 14th, 2021, 2:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3402
Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
So I am curious if what route you decided to do, and how it was?

_________________
"I've never met a river I didn't like. The challenges are what we remember, and the experiences will make great memories for when I can pick up my paddle no more". Me


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 29 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group