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PostPosted: August 17th, 2020, 4:11 pm 
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Hi

Buy Astral Brewer! I paddle all season March to November I start with Sealskin in March and finish with wool socks in October, great for long hikes and you can use as sliper, they wide box and go for size above if you want use with Neoprene socks.


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PostPosted: August 17th, 2020, 8:48 pm 
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Location: Waterloo, ON
With the exception of the chilly shoulder season, I bring 2 pairs of hiking shoes. Wet, portage shoes which are non-waterproof, preferably with a Vibram sole. A proper hiking shoe, fully enclosed. I also bring a pair of "waterproof" hiking shoes as my dry pair for around camp.

The wet shoes are typically wet nearly all trip. The dry shoe are sacred, and never get more than a little dewey. The reason I use "waterproof" shoes as my dry shoes is that, often, there may be wet foliage around camp, and the goretex, etc. keeps them dry. Meanwhile, I avoid goretex with the wet / portage / tripping shoes, as they are sure to be submerged daily, so having a waterproof barrier in the shoe actually inhibits drying.

Also, I keep my dry socks tucked into my dry shoes when packed, so that, at the end of the day when it's time to take off the portage shoes and get into my dry ones, the socks are accessible.

Keen sandals (covered toes) and the like are an injury waiting to happen in most tripping situations. They may be ok out on Georgian Bay, but not in the interior. Likewise with other types of dedicated light weight 'water shoes'.

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PostPosted: August 19th, 2020, 6:33 am 
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canoeguitar wrote:

Keen sandals (covered toes) and the like are an injury waiting to happen in most tripping situations. They may be ok out on Georgian Bay, but not in the interior. Likewise with other types of dedicated light weight 'water shoes'.


Well said and our reason for doing the same as you. Plus with proper shoes we found we are not as sore at the end of the day and are a little faster on the portages.

I go on a couple of canoeing fishing trips in the early spring and fall. I use hip boots for them, expensive but last for ever. Roll them down in the canoe and pull them up to jump in the water. Warm and waterproof up to your thighs. Guys laughed the first time I tried it, till they where pulling the canoes up a creek with ice on the edge of the water and numb feet.


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PostPosted: August 19th, 2020, 8:18 am 
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SaskFly wrote:
canoeguitar wrote:

I go on a couple of canoeing fishing trips in the early spring and fall. I use hip boots for them, expensive but last for ever. Roll them down in the canoe and pull them up to jump in the water. Warm and waterproof up to your thighs. Guys laughed the first time I tried it, till they where pulling the canoes up a creek with ice on the edge of the water and numb feet.


I use "Wellies" for cold water trips.

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PostPosted: August 19th, 2020, 1:54 pm 
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Captaincanadian wrote:
I use Merrell Portage Shoes or what is now (sometimes) names Choprock shoes. They are very light, very durable(so far 2yrs and 100 ports), and the sole is one of the most aggressive ones I have ever seen on any style shoe or boot. I can step onto a slimy slopped rock and not slide one bit and they are comfortable enough for portages, even long ones. They have very good drainage, the 'body' section is neoprene and they fully lace up so they wont come off, I have stepped into leg length mud holes in the marsh and had no issue at all. I paid $89 at sail for them two years ago. I bring a light pair of hiking shoes for around camp and wear the portage ones all day while tripping. I love these shoes, try them, you wont be disappointed.


Are you the gentleman that sold me a pair of these at Outdoors Oriented earlier this year?
If so, thanks for the advice, they are a great shoe!
I just have to figure out how to stop the skeeters from lunching on my feet now.


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PostPosted: August 19th, 2020, 4:12 pm 
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permethrin


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PostPosted: September 4th, 2020, 12:20 pm 
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canoeguitar wrote:
The reason I use "waterproof" shoes as my dry shoes is that, often, there may be wet foliage around camp, and the goretex, etc. keeps them dry. Meanwhile, I avoid goretex with the wet / portage / tripping shoes, as they are sure to be submerged daily, so having a waterproof barrier in the shoe actually inhibits drying.

Also, I keep my dry socks tucked into my dry shoes when packed, so that, at the end of the day when it's time to take off the portage shoes and get into my dry ones, the socks are accessible.

Keen sandals (covered toes) and the like are an injury waiting to happen in most tripping situations. They may be ok out on Georgian Bay, but not in the interior. Likewise with other types of dedicated light weight 'water shoes'.



I like your system and reasoning. Or maybe just your reasoning, and therefore your system lol. But what would be the reason to not wear even faster drying, like crocks on site? And even surer to be not damp? Purely the lost protection?

I bring crocks for site because they dry faster than fast (if wet), no damp issue (virtually), and they are so light and so have ultimate breath-ability, and so comfortable, and so easy to get on and off). If I need ankle support getting firewood it's a quick swap. Crocks even have holes for the purpose of being used as a fly swatter.

I agree with you that crocks etc for ongoing travel is a rather unwise choice.


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PostPosted: September 4th, 2020, 3:48 pm 
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I cut down my worn-out gumboots into primitive blundstones. Easy to yank on and off with one hand for launching and landing. My favourite other shoes were the Inov8 Flyroc 310's. Light, comfy, great tread, and last me a year of daily use. I can't buy them locally anymore - unfortunately.


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PostPosted: September 8th, 2020, 11:09 am 
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Anyone ever considered these (any on the page) ? https://www.pocomarine.com/shop/viking- ... ting-boot/ or anything like these?

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PostPosted: September 8th, 2020, 11:45 am 
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cheryl wrote:
Anyone ever considered these (any on the page) ? https://www.pocomarine.com/shop/viking- ... ting-boot/ or anything like these?

not on you r life. I have a pair like that. Good for ocean cleanups where we are in and out of a motorboat picking up trash on beaches. After four hours of walking on boulders and sand they simply kill your feet. as. Lobstermen always use them as they keep your feet dry and warm while standing in water for hours


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PostPosted: September 9th, 2020, 8:07 am 
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Location: St. Catharines, Ontario
In colder weather I usually wear a pair of tall Hunter Rain boots. Lots of grip on wet rocks, waterproof almost right up to your knee and soft and moccasin like while your in the canoe.

Warm weather it's just a pair of Columbia Drainmakers with some thin nylon socks.


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PostPosted: September 10th, 2020, 8:44 am 
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Location: Lethbridge, Alberta Canada
Age old question :)

I've tried a number of combinations. Still not there yet.
I'd like to get 1 shoe that can be adaptable to warm and cold paddling seasons so it needs to accommodate neoprene socks/dry suit/thin wool socks for the cold or just thin socks if its warm. For me, I need usually a size 13 (or bigger) in most shoes to do this. They also need to have traditional laces (not bungies) in order to be able to tighten them enough - most water shoes have bungies so the're out. And many aren't sized big enough (Columbia Drainmaker).

The Columbia Drainmaker is a pretty durable shoe but it doesn't dry near as fast as I would've thought and it's too small for me for cold weather with the added layers I want > so this I like but just for warm weather. Again, it doesn't dry much faster than regular trail runners so I'd just get trail runners that are more comfortable next time

I also tried the seal skin socks but they are so thick that I think I'd need a size 14 or 15 shoe to get over them - which I'm unlikely to find

I do have laceable wetsuit boots as others have mentioned but am reluctant to try them. They just seem overly bulky and overkill unless its really cold(?) ... maybe I should try...

I now have a solomon tech lite which do fit the layering combinations that I want (except the seal skins) with real laces. Not as robust as Drainmaker but we'll see. Heading out tomorrow for 10ish days and the temps aren't likely to get over the low teens so that should test them pretty good.

https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=inLjSLWA&id=C5D9EFBE3F1DA69B034FF96D598D703AD72D2AE4&thid=OIP.inLjSLWAk3E_E6dikpRo9AHaHa&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fcontent.backcountry.com%2fimages%2fitems%2f900%2fSAL%2fSALZ94R%2fQUISHA.jpg&exph=900&expw=900&q=solomon+tech+lite&simid=607990588441300511&ck=8243EC55DD3479CF02A22C88C83F66AD&selectedIndex=1&FORM=IRPRST



Those Merrels look good though too...


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PostPosted: September 10th, 2020, 2:50 pm 
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Salomon Techphibian 3 with traditional socks, for typical use. Being mostly mesh they do not carry any water. With socks, they are secure enough to provide good footing and traction, without blisters or hot spots in the shoe. Great choice for day to day wet/dry needs.

Darn Tough wool socks and Salomon GTX3 in my dry clothes bag. They really only get used for long or tough trails, and my emergency footwear. I do my best to keep them from being swamped, and back in the dry bag when not on my feet.

Most of the day in the boat, light portage trails and at camp, I wear slip on sandals.


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