View topic - Footwear while tripping

It is currently December 5th, 2020, 9:55 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 43 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: August 11th, 2020, 8:28 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 29th, 2006, 7:57 pm
Posts: 544
Location: Toronto
The question of footwear is a perennial one we keep coming back to. Witness the last four years of myccr threads for some examples!

Footwear recommendations for spring portaging

Portaging Footwear


So What’s Next For Footwear?

August Footwear

_________________
http://albinger.me/canoe-tripping/


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 11th, 2020, 8:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5705
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Ok, but no harm in booting it around 1 more time. :P

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 11th, 2020, 9:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 18th, 2019, 7:54 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Brampton
I see what you did there :p I'll boot it around one more time...

I've tried footwear two ways - 1) day shoes and camp shoes, and 2) dry shoes and wet shoes

With the first method, I keep a pair of shoes/boots on all day and I don't worry about getting wet, although I may dry them in the boat on a long portage-free leg. Then after putting in for the night, change in to camp shoes, and dry the day shoes by the fire/in the sun as much as possible. Shoes/boots with drainage (I call them "jungle boots") are best for day shoes with this method. The obvious major advantage to this method is always having dry feet once the paddling is done, as well as not needing to worry about changing footwear during the day. The major disadvantage is that I have yet to find footwear that works well both in water and on difficult portages, and that your feet are typically wet for most of the day, until you put in for the evening.

With the second method, I have a pair of standard hiking boots, and a pair of water shoes. I change them as the situation warrants. On easy portages, water shoes can be used, but they don't provide any ankle support (at least mine don't), so beware of rocks and sprained ankles. The major advantages are that each can be much more specialized for their intended purpose, and your feet generally stay wet only when you're wearing water shoes (bare feet dry pretty quickly when you need to change back). Purpose made water shoes dry quite quickly and are easy to clean - unlike hiking boots. The major disadvantage is that, sooner or later, you will slip into the water in your dry shoes, and now you have two pairs of wet shoes - but as mentioned, water shoes typically dry very quickly, at least in the sun. In these cases I generally just wear whatever pair is driest in the evening.

Currently I'm sporting a pair of Keen Targhee waterproof hiking shoes and a pair of Leguano Actives as water shoes. The Keens are a bit low at the back of the ankle for my liking, but otherwise have performed admirably so far. I have a pair of Keen winters that I'm just enamored with since I bought them. The Leguanos are made for and marketed to barefoot runners, but I've found them to be spectacular water shoes.

re: Stock being crap at MEC - it's not just MEC. All the outfitter stores, especially the big box stores in southern Ontario, are having stock issues; most are placing the blame on the virus. I was at Cabela's in Barrie a few weeks ago and they were having the same issues. I was looking for water filter bits&bobs and they were basically sold out. The way they tell it, they justs can't keep stock on the shelf this year. In Thunder Bay we needed to pick up a canine lifejacket. The whole town was sold out. I'm sure it will get better as things begin to return to normal.

_________________
If you ate today, thank a farmer.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 7:19 am 
Offline

Joined: November 6th, 2019, 11:01 am
Posts: 68
Location: Toronto
Wow those Leguano's look great, PacketFiend a little expensive though! Thanks for the reference true_north, I reviewed them all, looks like a lot of personal preference and not too much agreement on what is the best method! I will stick to lite, breathable trail shoes for now on and hope they dry/drain quickly. I just don't want them to be able to get sucked off my foot, I hate that! Cheers everyone.

_________________
YouTube: Solo Wilderness Adventures
https://tinyurl.com/y8x4ubn4


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 8:25 am 
Offline

Joined: January 25th, 2004, 2:59 pm
Posts: 255
Location: Ottawa
+ 1 for Bean boots. Perfect for the portage in/out of the boat. I have the 10" . For long portages I switch to a proper trail/hiking shoe as I find the bean boots sole to be lacking. Too thin and the tread not as aggressive as I like when scrambling up a steep incline.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 9:58 am 
Offline

Joined: September 4th, 2014, 4:53 pm
Posts: 42
I've been wearing the Salomon Techamphibians for a while. Mine are a couple of generations old.

They're alright - but I think as you've ascertained, aren't the most robust. I don't do a whole lot of hard portaging - where they're fine. I just find that they don't dry as quickly as they should.

I always bring hikers for hiking/camp when the paddling is done.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 10:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 18th, 2019, 7:54 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Brampton
jbrave wrote:
Wow those Leguano's look great, PacketFiend a little expensive though!


True, they're not cheap. But they're well built, and in Germany, not Thailand. Personally I drop top dollar on shoes and mattresses (or sleeping bags); I spend 8 hours a day in them. IMHO neither is the right place to skimp.

_________________
If you ate today, thank a farmer.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 10:59 am 
Offline

Joined: November 6th, 2019, 11:01 am
Posts: 68
Location: Toronto
Here, here - PacketFiend. I second that opinion strongly. And as they come with a personal recommendation, that would ease the risk of spending that much on a product you hadn't tested yet. They also look very lite and bendable. I will test them out soon if the new Merrell's I got aren't up to snuff. Cheers.

_________________
YouTube: Solo Wilderness Adventures
https://tinyurl.com/y8x4ubn4


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 11:51 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 21st, 2006, 8:41 pm
Posts: 168
Location: Southern Ontario
I use Merrell Portage Shoes or what is now (sometimes) names Choprock shoes. They are very light, very durable(so far 2yrs and 100 ports), and the sole is one of the most aggressive ones I have ever seen on any style shoe or boot. I can step onto a slimy slopped rock and not slide one bit and they are comfortable enough for portages, even long ones. They have very good drainage, the 'body' section is neoprene and they fully lace up so they wont come off, I have stepped into leg length mud holes in the marsh and had no issue at all. I paid $89 at sail for them two years ago. I bring a light pair of hiking shoes for around camp and wear the portage ones all day while tripping. I love these shoes, try them, you wont be disappointed.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

_________________
Outbound2Explore

Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit. ~ Edward Abbey


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 12:17 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 18th, 2019, 7:54 pm
Posts: 121
Location: Brampton
Try the Leguanos before you buy them though. It's like you're not wearing shoes at all. Remember, they're made for barefoot runners. Ironically, I run, but not barefoot, so I don't even use them for their intended purpose. It's not everyone's cup of tea but they work for me.

They sold me at the Outdoor Adventure show this year, I imagine they'll be back next year with a good selection of shoes to try, or they have a store in Lakefield, outside Peterborough, if you're in the area.

_________________
If you ate today, thank a farmer.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 12th, 2020, 12:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: November 6th, 2019, 11:01 am
Posts: 68
Location: Toronto
CaptainCanada, those Merrell's look perfect! It all came down to selection and sizes unfortunately but yea those look perfect.

_________________
YouTube: Solo Wilderness Adventures
https://tinyurl.com/y8x4ubn4


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 13th, 2020, 8:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5705
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
PacketFiend wrote:
I see what you did there :p I'll boot it around one more time...



glad you got a kick out of that quip! :D

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 13th, 2020, 2:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: November 7th, 2010, 4:35 pm
Posts: 315
I've been using Rocky SV1 jungle boots. Lace up tight. Good ankle protection and good support. Very tough so far. They drain quickly but don't really "dry". They'll be damp constantly unless you can avoid submersing your feet for a full day.

I've greatly appreciated the above the ankle canvas when wading rocky rapids and my feet slipping down between rocks. It's not exactly padded but it's better than nothing.

They took a long time to break in and hurt my feet until they did. I used them for local hiking before tripping in them for break in. I could do about 30-45 minutes before my feet would start to hurt pretty bad. I always stopped before they caused an actual blister. I didn't think they were every going to get better and then, after about 10 outings, suddenly they were fine. No problems since, including wearing them for 1 1/2 months every day on a trip.

Alan


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 13th, 2020, 3:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 9th, 2020, 10:24 pm
Posts: 4
This has been a long time problem for me too. Used to use crocs because they dried so fast - but they can be too slippery / dangerous on all but the tamest of portages (plus it seems like sticks / rocks and leeches find their way in).

Last trip I went with wool socks and gortex hiking boots which were fine for traction, comfort and foot protection especially when lining up rocky rapids where you can't see where you are stepping. But the gortex hikers don't drain very well.

It got me thinking about my flyfishing wading boots as a possible solution. Traditionally wading boots were big heavy and clunky but in the last few years various fly fishing mfgs have started making "light weight" versions of wading boots more similar to hikers. The benefit is these boots are generally specifically designed for walking on slippery rocks in streams so you typically get really aggressively treaded vibram type soles, good toe protection and ankle support as well they have dedicated drainage ports for evacuating water. They are also designed / sized to fit with a thick neoprene wading boot so you could adjust sizing up or down a bit to dial in your own sock system (goretex socks or thicker neoprene when cold and thinner wool / synthetic socks when warmer.). My wading boots are not these sorts of lightweight versions and are big without the neoprene waders but maybe Santa will be good to me this year to get another pair to try this theory out. Links to some possible solutions:

https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/mens/ ... ading-shoe

https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/mens/ ... neaker-s19

https://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/mens/ ... t-boot-s19

https://www.orvis.com/p/men-s-ultraligh ... -boot/2j2r

https://www.orvis.com/p/men-s-pro-approach-shoes/2tz2


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 13th, 2020, 8:21 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3343
Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
Thoes approach shoes look like a terrific comibination!

_________________
"I've never met a river I didn't like. The experience is what we remember and the challenges make for great memories". Me


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 43 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group