View topic - North Saskatchewan River

It is currently December 10th, 2019, 11:23 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: North Saskatchewan River
PostPosted: February 20th, 2017, 1:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 20th, 2017, 12:34 am
Posts: 18
Hello everyone! First time poster(just registered yesterday). I'm planning a solo kayak trip this summer from Edmonton to North Battleford sometime in Late May/Early June. I can't seem to find out any information on the net about it(water levels, rapids, length of trip etc). Any info would be greatly appreciated.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 20th, 2017, 6:07 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 20th, 2003, 9:27 am
Posts: 943
For the Alberta portion, I would recommend that you purchase Mark's Guide for Alberta Paddlers
http://members.shaw.ca/marksguide/

Here is a PDF of the Edmonton to Saskatchewan border section:
http://www.paddlealberta.org/pdf/trips/ ... undary.pdf

I did a quick search for the reach from the Alberta-Saskatchewan border to North Battleford but didn't find much useful information.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 20th, 2017, 9:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 5th, 2015, 9:32 pm
Posts: 81
Location: Saskatchewan
This may help with length of trip.

http://www.paddlinglight.com/articles/t ... wan-river/

_________________
My YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/GRSRiverrider


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 21st, 2017, 6:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2016, 10:37 am
Posts: 71
Location: Northern Alberta
Agreed that Mark Lunds Guide is a good first step- maybe even contact him directly for more info. His contact info is on the Paddle Alberta website.

Traditionally Late May early June should be low water before most of the snowmelt but this year who knows? Not much snow and its already melting...

I was part of a Voyageur Brigade on the North Saskatchewan from Rocky Mountain House to Prince Albert celebrating David Thompson in 2008. ( And Mark Lund was part of that trip!) We left in May in snow and water was fairly low- there were a number of gravel bars along sections of the river Elk Point to the Battlefords but they shouldn't be an issue for a kayak.
While its a historically important route, the North Saskatchewan in this section isn't particularly scenic- and in some spots is unpleasant: we passed cattle carcasses at the rivers edge at a couple of spots.

Bruce


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 23rd, 2017, 5:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 22nd, 2003, 6:52 pm
Posts: 194
Location: Edmonton Alberta
It's a nice week long trip for solo. Water will most likely be low again this season. So easy camping at all the creek "fans". I've always found the valley nice with a lot of birds. You see many new families floating together. Remember you must take water with you. There are places along the way to refill container. The wind comes up just before noon for a few hours so eat lunch and have a nap!.

_________________
Keep your paddle in the water and lean downstream!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 24th, 2017, 6:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 24th, 2007, 1:52 pm
Posts: 556
Location: Beaumont, AB
On the North Saskatchewan, there is substantial flow even at times of "low water". That means there will be lots of water for paddling, so you do not need to worry about dragging your kayak through shallow sections for miles on end.

_________________
Dave W
"Everyone must believe in something. I believe I'll go canoeing" - Henry David Thoreau


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 26th, 2017, 5:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 9th, 2005, 2:27 pm
Posts: 1642
Location: Saskatoon
You might want to chat with these folks: https://mywildcanada.com/

There should be plenty of water for paddling, as icebreaker says, but it can be quite low, at least in the Saskatchewan portion of your trip. Low water means slower progress because there is less water to push you, but also slower because there is MUCH more meandering that is needed to follow the course of the flow, so you have to actually paddle quite a bit farther. Also at low flow there will be running aground and dragging over the sandbars, especially when you misjudge the course of the current.

This is not to steer you away from the trip, just be aware that water levels can matter a lot.

Cheers,
Bryan

_________________
Bryan's website - http://pawistik.net
ColdspringPaddling.com
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 26th, 2017, 11:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 20th, 2017, 12:34 am
Posts: 18
Thank you for all the replies.

Pook - How were the rapids? Mostly class 1 to class 2? Was the battelfords to Prince Albert pretty much the same or a little more scenic? Seeing a few cattle carcasses probably wouldn't bother me. It's not the dead animals I would worry about, it's the live ones. A charging bull would probably give me a scare!

GRS riverrider, I clicked and read the link. Pretty interesting. The guy noted seeing lots of wildlife and Oil refineries, and meeting lots of people along the way. He didn't really give a good timetable about how long it took him though. Still an interesting read none the less.

Ralph - thanks for the links they were very helpful! I'm going to look into purchasing marks guide.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 27th, 2017, 10:03 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2016, 10:37 am
Posts: 71
Location: Northern Alberta
RGS

The white water was class 1 . As pawistik mentioned its important to read the river to follow the best route- its wide and shallow in lots of places.
Yes, after the Battlefords there is less industrial activity and it does get more Scenic, especially after Borden Bridge .

Re-reading my earlier comments makes it sound like the N Sask is a downer- not at all, just don't expect the French River!

Enjoy!
Bruce


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 28th, 2017, 10:14 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 20th, 2017, 12:34 am
Posts: 18
"Re-reading my earlier comments makes it sound like the N Sask is a downer- not at all, just don't expect the French River!"

You say the French river, do you mean the Montreal river?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 1st, 2017, 7:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2016, 10:37 am
Posts: 71
Location: Northern Alberta
Not all- one of my favourite paddles is the French River into Georgian Bay...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 2nd, 2017, 1:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 20th, 2017, 12:34 am
Posts: 18
Oh I see, the French river is in Ontario. Sorry my bad. I thought you were referring to the Montreal when you said "French". I paddled the Montreal river on May long weekend of 2015 from the highway 165 bridge to La Ronge. Took me about 3 days. That for the most part was very scenic, especially the first 3-4 hours.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 9th, 2017, 8:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 5th, 2015, 9:32 pm
Posts: 81
Location: Saskatchewan
Just curious, but how are you getting to and from your trip?

When you do the trip there's an island near Maidstone called Pine Island where there were trading posts and boat building. A major stop on the river in the late 1700's. Probably worth a look-see or an overnight stay.

Edit: I just went and read a bit about it online and it says it's protected and preserved. So maybe an overnighter is out of the question?

_________________
My YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/GRSRiverrider


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 9th, 2017, 10:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 20th, 2017, 12:34 am
Posts: 18
GRS Riverrider wrote:
Just curious, but how are you getting to and from your trip?


I'll drive from Saskatoon and have someone follow me to North Battleford. I'll drop my car off there somewhere along the river. Then I'll get a ride with them from North Battleford to Edmonton with my kayak and my supplies. then I'll do the trip and when I get to North Battleford I'll paddle to where my car is and drive home.

Iv'e been doing a little bit more research on the trip. I think i'm going to start about 100-200 km downstream of Edmonton as I will only have 9 days to do this(I'll take a week off work). It looks like a 8-10 day trip and I kinda want to enjoy it instead of constantly worrying about time. I made that mistake last year when I only gave myself 4 days when I paddled from Saskatoon to the forks last May. I made it back to my car with an hour of sunlight left on my last day, and I had to work the next morning. 2 of the first 4 days I was paddleing into a strong oncoming wind and then I had to make it up the last 2 days, paddeling 70 km both days.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 10th, 2017, 1:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2016, 10:37 am
Posts: 71
Location: Northern Alberta
We carefully noted Pine Island on our 2008 David Thompson Brigade-we actually camped at Big Gully Creek in the pouring rain.
Pine Island was where David Thompson broke his leg and almost died. His recovery included extensive training in basic surveying and astronomy under Philip Turnor that changed his career and probably that of Canada.
Though it was an incredibly important trading post- 5 forts on the island!!!- in the late 1700's, there isn't anything there now and the historic marker mentioning it is located high on the bank of the N Saskatchewan.

Bruce


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 21 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group