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how do you stereotype Canoers?
isolationists 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
closet drunk who prefers to drink in the bush 5%  5%  [ 2 ]
escapists 21%  21%  [ 8 ]
environmentalists, or 'tree-huggers' 8%  8%  [ 3 ]
fisherman too poor to buy a motor boat 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
traveller/ explorer who prefers self propulsion 67%  67%  [ 26 ]
Tilley Hatter 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Total votes : 39
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 Post subject: The Canoers Stereotype
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 5:14 pm 
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Joined: April 3rd, 2003, 5:35 am
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Location: NORTHERN ONTARIO
How are canoeists stereotyped? I was bad mouthing ‘snowmobilers’ the other day, and I realized that I of course was only spouting off stereotypes that may or may not be accurate, and I got to thinking how do people stereotype paddlers? Do they see us as environmentalists? Sedated observers of nature? Isolationists? Are we rednecks? Or are we self propelled travelers? Lazy? Crazy? What?

We must fall into some kind of stereotype; otherwise we wouldn’t all be loosely connected this forum, or have successful “gatherings”.

So, what are we? What makes you a canoer, versus say a snowmobiler, yachter, IT guy, a teacher, or a Trekkie? What’s our connection? What characterizes us as paddlers? What traits do we share? If a paddler walked by you on the street, what would give you the impression that he/she was a paddler, especially a canoer? Their clothes? Tilley hat perhaps? The four canoes precariously strapped atop their car?

Or are we truly just a collage from all walks of life? From farmers and CEO’s, hockey fanatics to equestrian riders that simply happen to appreciate canoeing.

Anyway, just food for thought. and why not make it a poll?


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PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 5:36 pm 
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Joined: June 21st, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Woodstock, Ontario Canada
Couldn't pick one. The reason my Family and friends canoe is to get away from the crowds and distractions of car camping. We get beautiful campsites on the water, no noise, no running to the store, no telephone or tv and we tend to bond and work together to make lasting memories.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 5:55 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
I can think of a few, but I won't bother with the survey - I'm not good at that sort of thing. Some examples:
* when showing up at a northern FN band's office recently, the staff there were refering to us amongst each other as "environmentalists" even though we introduced ourselves as canoeists. If this would have been the cafe in Temagami, they probably would have called us "tree huggers".
* no one says it openly, but amongst the northern townsfolk that rely on tourists, the term cheapskates is probably used a lot. But I am proud to be able to do a vacation with little expense to me and the environment - that's goodness as far as I am concerned.
* folks in the city will call us canoe heads (the image of someone portaging somehow is funny them - OK, they just don't know any better). But the more sensible folks here will look at us a masochists, and that's a term I can readily accept as a partial truth...
:wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 6:07 pm 
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Joined: January 1st, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 529
Location: Plainfield, Indiana USA
Here in the states I am starting to get the impression that canoeists are viewed negatively and looked down on. :tsk: Only drunks, rednecks or poor white trash canoe. I feel like I am handicapping myself when I mention to the young, highly educated, rich, urban co-workers that I am a wilderness canoeist. They can not look beyond the stereotype and assume I am lazy, closed minded and ignorant. When they hear about my wilderness trips or preparations for the next trip they become convince that I am a nut case.

On the other hand, they view those who kayak as being cool, aggressive and adventuresome. I can not help but wonder if these views are a result of marketing. I see drug and car ads celebrating life with a kayak. Rarely do I see a canoe and if I do it almost always has an elderly person in it drifting around.

From my personal discussions I believe ones age may determine which view you take here in the states.

Personally, I view my fellow wilderness paddlers as friends. We all have something in common. We are able to see the world around us and the person we really are more clearly. The ugly realities are not hidden by our daily distractions. If you stay out long enough in the bush you will eventually face your demons. I believe this experience makes us calmer, wiser, flexible and accepting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 6:32 pm 
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Joined: December 16th, 2004, 4:25 pm
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Location: bradford
Kayaks, snowboards, two of the same thing...

It appeals to the young! Easier to learn, No partner required (Until they actually carry those things! ..lol.) Good marketing helps! I have to be carefull what I say, don't want to offend any double bladers! (besides I actually own one! though I really can't see the big appeal? Guess I'm old!)

Cheapies?? Yes thats true! Guess most of us tend not to spend big bucks filling up gas tanks and coolers each day. No two week hotel/motel bills or trail passes to buy. I do try to spend some cash in the north, sort of a way of "sharing the wealth"..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 6:35 pm 
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Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
How about..."masochist". Have you ever notice that canoeists tell more stories about the "hard times"...wind, cold, bugs, etc...than the good stuff. These stories do little to "sell" others on the idea of canoeing, which may not be such a bad thing. :)

A canoeist at work onece commented to me " You know how it is when your out canoeing and it's a lousy day" all I could say was "Well.....actually......... no....." I've had windy, rainy, cold days...yes, but a "lousy' day...never! :lol:

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Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 6:53 pm 
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I dont see my favorite category (not that I would be a member of it)
That would be people who like to have an alibi for not taking a bath and getting covered in mud.
I am amazed at how many people get and stay dirty when canoeing on a peaceful warm lake in the summer.

Though we had a cold Missinaibi trip and upon embarking the train at Moose River Crossing got a few looks and promptly got a cup of coffee and a seat in the far corner.
We felt out of touch in Moosonee too with all those white footed and pantsed tourists around. Golly I didnt think we looked or smelled bad....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 7:07 pm 
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Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
pknoerr wrote:

In all my dealings with Jetskiers, they obviously think I'm a pylon... I can't wait until one gets within paddle length, because, I'm going to launch it into his face...By the way... Jetskiers aren't all assholes... but they become them when they climb onto the cursed craft.

PK


When does open season start anyway? :evil:

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Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 7:16 pm 
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I consider myself a traveler/explorer. But there are many distinctions and shades of grey. BTW, I seperate the term "canoer" and "Canoeist" but that is probably a different poll.

Here in the midwest we don't see many canoes riding on top of vehicles. We see more kayaks than canoes. Those poor dissillusioned masses.

While paddling down the muddy drainage ditches we call creeks and rivers we often hear:

"Whar ya'll goin? You'ns a'doin purdy good "oarin" them canoes" Oars? I don''t need no stinking oars, this is a PADDLE!

Masochists? No, I have to disagree there. I used to be an endurance spelunker. Now THAT"S masochism! :cry: :cry: :cry:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 8:32 pm 
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Hey, why can't you select all of the above?
Ted


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 18th, 2005, 9:11 pm 
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Joined: May 20th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Forest, Ontario Canada
Im a avid canoe guy and a snowmobiler..... hmm what kind of steriotype does that make me...., a enviormentalist high on 2 stroke oil, a sledder with a tilly hat, now Im just confused :P .

Todd


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 Post subject: image problem
PostPosted: January 19th, 2005, 5:01 am 
well it seems that if we (canoeists) have one thing in common, is
that there are a lot of strange views about us. And I thought this
was a European problem... Now I have learned that it is not, I have
to reconsider a lot of my ideas about this topic.
First question that comes to my mind is what is the cause of it? I
know that the image of canoeing here is mostly derived from people
with rented canoes, and that explains a lot, but not all. Another
source here are the outdoor magazines, that invariably publish
canoeing stories from people who hardly are able to paddle, often
first timers or beginners, and because of that they have really
'interesting' stories to tell. I always wonder what would people
think if they read stories about bicycle trips where people would
fall regularly from their bicycles, crash against object, cross busy
traffic streets without looking etc.

Dirk Barends


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 19th, 2005, 8:12 am 
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Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
How about cheapskate? Seems like a majority of people i have canoed with were "penny-pinchers" of the highest order. Perhaps its a quest to travel ultra-light, so they leave their money somewhere else.....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 19th, 2005, 8:28 am 
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Joined: May 21st, 2003, 7:50 am
Posts: 2400
Location: Mapping Wabakimi PP!
I like the term "Adventure Seeker"

A lot of my friends do not understand the canoeing thing too well but they do admire my ambition and passion to take on the different remote areas to explore and create an adventure with. Every year I will add to my journey a new location/place to explore. There is much more to it than canoeing, it's the planning, the preparation of food and equipment which makes us different.

Yeah, we fish, hug trees, pick up liter left by those who come with disrespect.
Yeah our costs can be much lower then a 5-star hotel.

But you can say you had waterfront property with wolves howling at night, a owl hooting along with the loons and a moose at our view. I don't think Busch Gardens offers that! I'd rather bump elbows with a tree (tree hugging activity) than a person on a crowded beach.

Rambling done!

Boneli

Remember, it's the paddle that leads the canoe
on it's journey.

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"Preservation of our waterways comes from those with little voices, big paddles, strong backs, weak minds and thick hides with which to ignore the bug bites." Organizer of "The Wabakimi Project"


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 19th, 2005, 8:30 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 65
Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
Outdoorsman (outdoors person..whatever)
Let's see...I used to guide in Algonquin for years and still canoe trip every year. Have a boat for the cottage on Georgian Bay (island) and an ATV for the huntcamp as I hunt deer, moose and small game. An SUV (jeep) to take the 2 canoes and trailer. Clean up neighbouring woodlots with my kids and help with stream rehabilitation. Yup, outdoorsman.

Dave


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