View topic - Transporting a Tent in a Compression/Dry Sack

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PostPosted: September 28th, 2017, 8:50 pm 
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The other day when I was packing my tent in my bag for a trip, I started to wonder if it would be possible to put my tent in a compression sack to help reduce its bulk in my backpack. Obviously the poles and pegs would have to be packed separately but by putting the tent and fly in a compression/dry sack, I could really reduce its size. Plus if I ever dumped my canoe, my shelter would stay dry.

Does anyone have any insight on if putting a tent in a compression/dry sack helps? I'll a little nervous to try it because I'm worried that packing my tent so tightly might not be good for the seams.


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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 7:39 am 
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I've done that for years now. El Capitan 2, including fly, and a MEC Scout tarp goes easily into a 32 L. OR AirX bag. Before that, I did the same with my MEC Wanderer. Never had an issue - works really well. :)

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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 7:47 am 
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Packing a damp tent each day? If the package gets hot at all welcome to the world of mold and mildew. At least it will stink.

If you confine yourself to cold weather camping you will be fine. And perhaps short term you will be fine

We have made the mistake of keeping the tent confined to a dry bag all summer.. We threw it out.


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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 8:01 am 
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I have always packed my tent in a drybag with the fly (which rarely gets completely dry before packing up in t he morning) inside a garbage bag to keep the tent itself as dry as possible. Never had any problems with tent seams, mildew, etc.

Of course, I wouldn't leave a damp tent inside a sealed container for more than a day. . . .


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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 9:49 am 
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I always do this as well...can't imagine not doing it.

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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 10:38 am 
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+4 for dry bags! You can halve the space required!

However, I keep the fly in a separate dry bag so that the inner tent does not get wet.

Once home the tent gets a thorough drying and then goes into a very roomy box so that it does not spend the winter all scrunched up in the dry bag.

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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 11:09 am 
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Some factory tent bags are essentially compression bags.. Except there is nothing to compress. We have a Marmot tent that requires securely using velcro compression straps to even think of getting it back in the bag.

At home it flies free in the rafters of the barn.


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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 2:24 pm 
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littleredcanoe wrote:
Some factory tent bags are essentially compression bags.. Except there is nothing to compress. We have a Marmot tent that requires securely using velcro compression straps to even think of getting it back in the bag.

At home it flies free in the rafters of the barn.



Because the bag my Marmot came in is so small that it's essentially useless I also use a dry bag, not a true compression bag but essentially the same as I use my knees to squeeze out as much air as possible before closing. At home it's stored in a giant (breathable) laundry bag.

My main "tent" is a single wall floorless shelter, I make no attempt to pack it dry nor keep it dry on the water. With 80 square feet of space and subject to condensation on the inside it just stays wet for days on end in rainy weather.

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PostPosted: September 29th, 2017, 10:46 pm 
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Thanks everyone for the reassurance. I'm going to start doing this on my trips


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2017, 8:20 am 
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Good question. I put my Hubba Hubba in a compression sack for our September trip. Tho' already small, it nearly disappeared into the bottom of our dry bag. Nice. The damp fly I always packed separately but also compressed. During the trip I was concerned with the extreme wrinkles in the material from all that crushing, but they'd disappear when the tent was set up. Perhaps I shouldn't have stuffed the tent the same way sleeping bags are recommended to be stuffed, ie not folded nor rolled but just arbitrarily shoved in. At home airing out the gear I noticed the fly seams look cracked and ready to peel. When this topic thread question was asked I was expecting to find out I was wrong to try crushing my tent. I'm surprised to hear otherwise.
Do you fold your tent and fly (as you might do for storage) before compressing, or do you just shove it in the c-sack as you do your sleeping bag? Are these cracked seams from normal wear and tear or am I the crushing culprit?


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2017, 11:41 am 
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I don't think it's a good idea to compress a tent - there's nothing to gain and lots to loose. Firstly, as somebody mentioned above, there's nothing to compress in a tent, but most importantly it's really easy to damage delicate tent fabric compressing it together with plastic hooks and corners.


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2017, 6:37 pm 
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I just leave mine in the regular tent case it came in, then put the whole thing in a SealLine 115L dry sac/backpack along with everything else. (Except for food.) A 115L dry sac gives a lot of piece of mind and there's enough space that you won't have to worry about compressing the tent - Eddy Turn makes a good point - but you can still safely compress clothing/sleeping bag if you want.


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PostPosted: October 13th, 2017, 6:32 am 
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I see little point is compressing your gear. By stuffing and compressing your gear by hand into a barrel or large dry bag you can get a lot of gear into it. I find that compression sacs make these really hard balls of gear that once in a barrel they leave a lot of empty space around them and make it difficult to get the barrel lid closed because the gear no longer can be pushed down.

I never compress any of my gear, but that may be why I usually do two trips on a portage.

I almost always use a 60l barrel for my personnel gear and have for the past 25 years. This summer the kids(9 &11) and I did an 11 day trip in Temagami and the barrel held the following - my clothes for 11 days(usually put in a sleeping bag stuff sac), sleeping bag(not in compression sac or stuff sac), dry shoes, 4 person tent and poles(MEC Wanderer put inside its stuff sac), 15x15 CCS tarp(stuffed into the ridgeline bag), thermarest(20 year old LE, regular width, 6ft long) extra fishing line and reel, and some other small miscellaneous stuff that I am forgetting. Depending on the trip, and with a three person tent, I can also get 12 beer in my barrel. All this gear is the limit of what I can comfortably carry with a canoe on my head.

rab


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PostPosted: October 14th, 2017, 10:06 am 
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+1 for the compression sack, packing a wet fly separately on trip and not storing the tent in a compressed anything. My off-season tent bag is a cotton MEC sleeping bag storage sack (https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5046-853/ ... torage-Bag).


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PostPosted: October 14th, 2017, 11:06 am 
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I don't use a compression sack but pack my poles separately. I pack the tent in the bottom of a barrel beside a sleeping bag in a compression sack and maybe something else like the poles vertically. When forcing everything in, It compresses the tent enough to give me more room.

I always fold the tent pieces before placing them in the bag. I also put them in in reverse order - inner ground sheet, fly (in an open lightweight dry bag), tent body, outer ground sheet - to make life easier if setting up in a hurry.


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