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PostPosted: October 2nd, 2017, 9:34 pm 
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What is KD?


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PostPosted: October 2nd, 2017, 10:38 pm 
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littleredcanoe wrote:
What is KD?


Kraft Mac & Cheese in the U.S. = Kraft Dinner in Canada


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PostPosted: October 6th, 2017, 1:36 pm 
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Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
We go for TVP (Textured Veg. Protien) quite often, as it takes on the flavour of whatevery you cook it with. Chili style meals are good choice. Make on site with other dehydrated ingredients, or make a home and dehydrate. TVP comes dehydrated and you can get it in most stores or bulk barn.

Check out bulk barn. Our Scouts/vents have often just carried their varieties of torellini's, and they have great eggless brownies (just add water). You can go on Bulk Barn website and see some of their offerings.

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PostPosted: October 6th, 2017, 4:12 pm 
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cheryl wrote:
We go for TVP (Textured Veg. Protien) quite often, a.



aka "Kibbles and Bits" :D

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PostPosted: October 15th, 2017, 7:43 am 
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Location: Stouffville, ON
I would like to nominate enhanced GORP. A bag of peanuts, a bag of raisins and a lesser amount of other nuts & dried fruits. Also, we have eggs on the first morning. Leftover eggs get hard boiled and will keep for a couple of days and are nutritious.


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PostPosted: March 10th, 2018, 4:30 pm 
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Has nobody mentioned bannock? A biscuit dough prepped dry at home and mixed with water in the camp stiff enough to wrap around a stick snake-fashion and cook over the fire provides lots of calories in carbs, is fun to cook and tastes wonderful. It is also protected from damage from wetting as it cakes on the outside of a bag when wet, and that cake is still edible.


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PostPosted: March 14th, 2018, 12:16 am 
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Prospector16 wrote:
Scouts are aged 11 to 14

Our first trip in 2 weeks is only 1km to base camp and then we are spending the weekend learning map reading skills and exploring the park.

Our second trip 4 weeks later is the same park but hike in 5km friday night, 6km saturday to the next camp, and 7km sunday back out.

In my view a couple of cans in a Scout's backpack won't be the end of the world for either trip, but part of what I want them to do is come to their own conclusions about weight. Part of this is we are going to weigh everything in and out and compare results at the end of the first trip. Then over the ensuing 4 weeks between discuss how to make the second trip even better. If some Scouts still want to carry a can of beans on the second one, that is up to them.

Thanks for all the feedback everyone - keep it coming!

Oh and yes cost is a factor - we like to keep it as low as possible.



These trips should have happened by now. So how did everything work out, Prospector16?
Successes & failures? Lessons learned?
It would be interesting to hear how it all went.


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PostPosted: March 14th, 2018, 5:19 pm 
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Both trips went extremely well.

I don't recall what our menu was on the first trip but we did group food based on input from the Scouts. There were a number of heavier items that they choose and we went with it as a means to teach them a lesson since our first trip was only shy of a km hike into the campsite and we were staying on site the whole weekend (basecamp - we did day hikes).

After first camp we did "review" meetings where we reviewed the first camp, what worked, what did not work, and used that to help plan the second trip. One thing the Scouts decided after the first camp was that they wanted to be responsible for their own food in patrols (Scouts Canada term for a group of 5 to 7 Scouts), so we spent some time in the meetings in between educating them on proper meal choice and emphasizing that on the 2nd trip we'd be hiking into one site Friday, moving to a second site on Saturday, and hiking back out on Sunday with a total hike distance of about 25 km.

What they ended up deciding was to go with commercial dehydrated meals and every Scout was to bring their own food for the second camp. We provided a comprehensive plan on what that entailed and it went well. Though that Friday night ended up being an early deep freeze where the temperature dropped to -12C overnight against a normally expected seasonal -2C, with temperatures going back to normal early Saturday. So we made the last minute decision to leave from Ottawa early Saturday morning and hike directly to the Saturday site, then back out on Sunday. That was a total of maybe 18km.

Also part of the second camp was discussions around lighter-weight shelters than regular tents, and Scouts decided in small groups of 2 or 3 to go with some form of tarp shelter or in one case the tent poles, external shell, and footprint without the inner tent of a MEC Wanderer 4 (the inner tent accounted for close to half the weight of the whole thing). Given the mid november timeframe that was a great choice since it was well beyond bug season.

Overall it was massively successful pair of camps and the Scouts learned quite a lot. And ever since then they've wanted to do patrol food for camp - for our winter camp we spend the meeting prior to camp at the Superstore where Scout Patrols purchased all their own food for the weekend and of course were responsible for cooking it at camp.

You can read more on the 2 camps on our blog and see pictures:

http://32ndottawascouting.blogspot.ca/2 ... -camp.html
http://32ndottawascouting.blogspot.ca/2 ... oaded.html


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PostPosted: March 19th, 2018, 3:36 pm 
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Prospector16 wrote:

Also part of the second camp was discussions around lighter-weight shelters than regular tents, and Scouts decided in small groups of 2 or 3 to go with some form of tarp shelter or in one case the tent poles, external shell, and footprint without the inner tent of a MEC Wanderer 4 (the inner tent accounted for close to half the weight of the whole thing). Given the mid november timeframe that was a great choice since it was well beyond bug season.



I gone that route with my Wanderer 2 on occasion. Good option to a simple tarp if inclement weather is expected.
Patrol-based planning would be my preference. More manageable.
Glad everything went well.


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PostPosted: May 20th, 2018, 8:59 am 
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RonB wrote:
Has nobody mentioned bannock? A biscuit dough prepped dry at home and mixed with water in the camp stiff enough to wrap around a stick snake-fashion and cook over the fire provides lots of calories in carbs, is fun to cook and tastes wonderful. It is also protected from damage from wetting as it cakes on the outside of a bag when wet, and that cake is still edible.


I like to include a short reading from Grey Owl's book Tales From An Empty Cabin about the old-time salt pork and bannock regime, just to up the romance level.


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PostPosted: May 20th, 2018, 9:04 am 
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If you want to go for the freeze dried route, I can recommend Bauly Foods in Brampton, Ontario. I find their meals heartier than what one finds at outdoor stores, and they supply separate ingredients such as meats, peas and green beans.

They have been very kind to us: friendly and willing to ship at short notice.

Son


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