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 Post subject: Looking at a new canoe.
PostPosted: August 30th, 2020, 10:50 am 
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Just wondering if anyone have can compare these 2 canoes for me. I started paddling last year and picked up a Clipper Solitude. I just sold it as it was not the boat for me. living in BC we have Clipper canoes and Hellman canoes. I was looking at the Caribou S from Clipper and the Solitude from Hellman.

http://www.clippercanoes.com/caribou-s/
http://hellmancanoes.com/the-solitude/

Don't know enough about how dimensions and specs differ canoes. Thank you for taking a look.


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PostPosted: August 30th, 2020, 10:07 pm 
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Hey. Utsikt
Still shopping eh!
Similar price points,
According to the specs, the soilitude is quite a bit wider especially at the gunnels, and a little more rocker so I’d expect it to be a little safer in rapids and slower on the flats. The clippers plenty stable, but I’d bet the solitude would be better in that regard.
I’m a little bias, but really it’s a coin flip.


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PostPosted: August 30th, 2020, 10:52 pm 
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The solitude is a flatwater boat built for speed. Talk to Marlin at Western.

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PostPosted: August 30th, 2020, 11:50 pm 
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
The Solitude is bigger, lighter, and (I'll dare to say) probably a more durable layup.

The Caribou will be a stiffer boat as all Clippers are. This will translate into a more efficient hull.

Order a Solitude and have Bob throw in an extra layer (or whatever is needed) to stiffen the hull up and still come in lighter than the Caribou.


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PostPosted: August 31st, 2020, 10:50 am 
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Haha yeah still looking. Most boats I can google and find tons of reviews and info but these two have absolutely nothing. After having the Clipper Solitude I'm a little gun shy to buy something and be disappointed. I do have plans to buy a tandem for the kids and I when they are a bit older and interested but in the mean time I want a dedicated solo that is more jack of all trades. Do longer trips like Bowron and Murtle. Overnighters and day trips for fishing. Something that allows me to take the dog or one of the kids just for afternoon paddles and maybe allows me to wet me feet into basic WW. When I look at these two boats. I have seen photos of Hellman Solitude but it was a tandem. I wonder if they just converted it to a dedicated solo whee the Caribou S was designed as a solo. Makes my head hurt haha thanks for the info.


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PostPosted: August 31st, 2020, 12:21 pm 
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Utsikt wrote:
..more jack of all trades. Do longer trips like Bowron and Murtle. Overnighters and day trips for fishing. Something that allows me to take the dog or one of the kids just for afternoon paddles and maybe allows me to wet me feet into basic WW.


Hmm, That sounds a lot like the Prospector zone.. and the Clipper 16 is only 15'9";
http://www.clippercanoes.com/16-foot-prospector/

Rather than getting a solo boat and putting kids and dogs into it until you need to buy a tandem, why not get a tandem that is fun to solo as well as loaded up;

Yesterday's fishing trip;
Attachment:
Fishn.jpg


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PostPosted: August 31st, 2020, 1:11 pm 
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I thought about doing that but when I get a tandem I would prob get something on the bigger size to take both kids and gear for camping. Being 6 and 4 right now it's hard enough to get them to go for hikes/walks in the woods lol. They just don't have much interest ATM and I wouldn't want to compromise my enjoyment on the hope they want to partake haha. I took them out in the Clipper solitude at a local lake for a little afternoon trip and it lasted about 20mins before they wanted to go back and hang with mommy. I'm sure with either one of these canoes I could add a drop in seat for the odd time they wanna tag along for the afternoon.


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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2020, 3:47 pm 
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After a few years of researching, and trying many different canoes, I decided to purchase a Hellman Prospector for solo paddling and am very happy with that decision. It is less like a Chesnut Prospector, and more like a Chesnut Cruiser at 34" beam, and 2" of rocker. The Duralite layup has proved to indeed be light and durable. Hellman claims it'll take an 8" distortion on impact, and pop right out again with no damage. After paddling it into, on to, and glancing-off some real uglies - I don't doubt it. That Duralite is good stuff.

I'm now seriously consider buying his Slocan, and if I had the cash, I'd get his Solitude as well. I've paddled Clipper's 16' Prospector in Kevlar many times, as well as their Tripper, Wenonah's 17' Sundowner, and a slew of others. I don't find Clipper's canoes as well designed as Hellman's, and Clipper seems to make compromises in their designs that give them some odd quirks in handling. My favourite 'other canoe' is Old Towne's 11' pack canoe, an odd choice I know, but little boats can be a lot of fun. There aren't a whole lot of manufacturers offering symmetrical canoes on the west coast. The fact that Hellman seems to specialize in them, is a blessing. For solo I'd suggest either his Solitude, or his Scout if you'd like more capacity, or use your chines heavily.


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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2020, 3:57 pm 
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Daniel Odd Job wrote:
I've paddled Clipper's 16' Prospector in Kevlar many times, as well as their Tripper, Wenonah's 17' Sundowner, and a slew of others. I don't find Clipper's canoes as well designed as Hellman's, and Clipper seems to make compromises in their designs that give them some odd quirks in handling.


As an owner of a Kevlar Clipper Tripper, I'd be curious about the quirks you found in this canoe and perhaps, what you would recommend in its stead as a fast, straight-tracking expedition boat.

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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2020, 4:19 pm 
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jefffski wrote:
Daniel Odd Job wrote:
I've paddled Clipper's 16' Prospector in Kevlar many times, as well as their Tripper, Wenonah's 17' Sundowner, and a slew of others. I don't find Clipper's canoes as well designed as Hellman's, and Clipper seems to make compromises in their designs that give them some odd quirks in handling.


As an owner of a Kevlar Clipper Tripper, I'd be curious about the quirks you found in this canoe and perhaps, what you would recommend in its stead as a fast, straight-tracking expedition boat.


Solo, I found the lightly-loaded Tripper (not the S model) prone to getting blown sideways by crosswinds, and biting the chine in to stop the side-slide, a scary proposition. Almost did a barrel-roll trying to regain control when an unexpected gust of 30knots hit me. In bigger seas, especially quartering wind or waves, I was fighting those bitey chines constantly - a pain in the azz - I honestly can't see the benefit of squared-off chines, unless it's to bolster initial stability for beginners.


Last edited by Daniel Odd Job on September 3rd, 2020, 4:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2020, 4:30 pm 
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Daniel Odd Job wrote:
jefffski wrote:
Daniel Odd Job wrote:
I've paddled Clipper's 16' Prospector in Kevlar many times, as well as their Tripper, Wenonah's 17' Sundowner, and a slew of others. I don't find Clipper's canoes as well designed as Hellman's, and Clipper seems to make compromises in their designs that give them some odd quirks in handling.


As an owner of a Kevlar Clipper Tripper, I'd be curious about the quirks you found in this canoe and perhaps, what you would recommend in its stead as a fast, straight-tracking expedition boat.


Solo, I found the lightly-loaded Tripper (not the S model) prone to getting blown sideways by crosswinds, and biting the chine in to stop the side-slide, a scary proposition. Almost did a barrel-roll trying to regain control when an unexpected gust of 30knots hit me. In bigger seas, especially quartering wind or waves, I was fighting those bitey chines constantly - a pain in the azz - I honestly can't see the benefit of squared-off chines, unless it's to bolster initial stability for beginners.


I get that but would that be a problem paddling it as a tandem? I've found it almost unbelievable into headwinds. I'll admit that anything bigger than sharp, short 2-foot waves can breach bow, stern or sides, but we've successfully paddled in 2-metre ocean swells and very choppy whitecaps. Still curious about tandem non-rockered boats you like and what they do better (as tandems) than the Tripper. I just haven't had your opportunities to demo many like it. Thx

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PostPosted: September 3rd, 2020, 5:03 pm 
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I went to edit post just as you replied Jeff. I realized I came off a bit snarky - sorry about that. Internet politeness is a struggle for me. I tend to be painfully blunt.
I have very little experience paddling tandem, I have many hours paddling solo, recently I've started co-paddling marathon canoes though so I expect I'll learn a thing or two.
Solo, I find canoes behave like slippery kayaks due to the light ends.
Wenonah's Sundowner 17, while similiar to the Tripper seems easier to control and more confidence inspiring. The Hellman Prospector (same hull as the Souris River I believe) is what I'm using, and have taken on long travels. Old Towne's Canadienne treated me well also.
Swell is less of an issue for me, the periods are usually large enough that it's basically a gentle up and down ride on the swell-evator. Landings in their surf can be un-nerving though. Wind creating 2'+ white-caps... I head for the beach. Weather changes, and I'd rather just sit it out than struggle my way through.


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PostPosted: September 4th, 2020, 2:14 am 
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Daniel Odd Job wrote:
I went to edit post just as you replied Jeff. I realized I came off a bit snarky - sorry about that. Internet politeness is a struggle for me. I tend to be painfully blunt.
I have very little experience paddling tandem, I have many hours paddling solo, recently I've started co-paddling marathon canoes though so I expect I'll learn a thing or two.
Solo, I find canoes behave like slippery kayaks due to the light ends.
Wenonah's Sundowner 17, while similiar to the Tripper seems easier to control and more confidence inspiring. The Hellman Prospector (same hull as the Souris River I believe) is what I'm using, and have taken on long travels. Old Towne's Canadienne treated me well also.
Swell is less of an issue for me, the periods are usually large enough that it's basically a gentle up and down ride on the swell-evator. Landings in their surf can be un-nerving though. Wind creating 2'+ white-caps... I head for the beach. Weather changes, and I'd rather just sit it out than struggle my way through.


No problem. I didn't notice but thanks. I should have realized that many people here paddle solo and specified that I am part of a tandem team, so that reflects my point of view of these canoes. I haven't had a chance to paddle other pure flatwater canoes as most people around here have prospectors for their river trips and make do with those on non-river trips. Those are wonderful, but they're not fast enough or straight-tracking enough for me.

Perhaps there is a reader out there who has paddled the Clipper Tripper and another pure flatwater canoe who can comment on that other canoe's speed and handling. I think Wenonah and Swift and a few other top notch manufacturers make similar models. Jensens don't cut it because they don't have enough freeboard for bigger waves. Longer canoes do very well, but 17'6" is long enough for me. Thx

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