View topic - Looking for answer, would a tumpline set up be the answer?

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PostPosted: April 15th, 2022, 2:25 pm 
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Two problems here hoping to see some setups or other solutions.
I am thinking that a tumpline setup would answer both mine and a friends problem.

Problem #1 Mine.
After recoveriing form major shoulder surgery 1+ year now, strength & flexability have returned with mostly no issues. I am back doing all my WW strokes, carrying the canoe and loading it no problem.
What I have found that even a simple light 10lbs day pack (about 1hr) does bother me on the one shoulder so I am concerned about having to carry a heavier back on portages.

Problem #2 (friend of mine) had a pacemaker implanted last year and has found he can no longer carry a back without the shoulder strap causing issues with his portage pack. He is in great shape but wishes to continue his trips.

So any info on solutions and setups to solve these problems would be greatly appreciated.

Jeff

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PostPosted: April 15th, 2022, 2:38 pm 
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Hi Jeff,

When I was 16 I carried 60 lbs in a canvas backpack with a tump line. I would alternate with the tump off and on. With tump off my back and shoulders hurt. With the tump on my neck would be on fire. I could never single carry because the canoe would dig into the tump strap and create agony for the neck. That was with my dad on the bow and me on the stern carrying a 90 lb canoe!

Hope this helps and good luck with the shoulder.
Richard


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PostPosted: April 15th, 2022, 10:11 pm 
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1, i suggest trying the tump to see what happens
i think there is a good chance it would help relieve said pain,
but it may introduce new pains, as mentioned.

2, i suggest framed packs, like eg, ostrom's wabakimi,
perhaps even better, any of the infinite supply of backpacking/hiking packs
ready to return it for another, if after testing it, same problem.

also, lots of different capacity options with backpacking/hiking packs.
which itself could help, since that positions the load differently relative to hips,

such pains might be removed via subtle changes in the positions of straps, etc.
so i'd go on mission to find the 'secret' working design.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2022, 8:20 am 
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I can load my Wabakimi ( Ostrom)so there is no load on the shoulder. It can transfer all the weight to the hips. Optimally for me I do have some weight on the shoulders. but its not necessary. I think the solution is for you to carry a internal framed pack with a hip belt.
Tumps are useful. But in order to minimize injury you have to practice with it with increasingly heavy loads. A neck injury is possible. I had a friend who guided in BWCA for years and tumps gave him compression cervical fractures.

I know people carry very heavy loads with tumps. But it is part of their everyday life.


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PostPosted: April 16th, 2022, 11:51 am 
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If you have no access to modern technologies or you just like to "old school" it, then tump it up.
It will help once you get good at using it.

An internal backpack is, by far, the most efficient way of transporting your gear on a longer portage.
So get a good fitting pack and make sure it can work with your portage system. (the one big downside of an internal is that you can't load it as high as you would while backpacking)

Next would be to start joining the "ultralight" movement with choices of gear.
Have options with your gear that allow you to reduce weight for certain trips/conditions.
I bet some campers could cut their pack weights in half with a little ingenuity and a lot of cash.

This is just what works for me.


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PostPosted: April 17th, 2022, 12:16 pm 
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Sounds like a plan but it also sounds like an experimental exercise and experience--your friend and you may need to try out as many as possible different setups and options to find something that works.

In addition to the tumpline, I'd try frameless and framed packing including internal and external. Straight shoulder straps and S curved one. Women and men packs. Soft and firm shoulder straps. Waist belts. Chest straps. Wide canoe packs. Narrow packs. Try the double pack style without the rear pack (only wear a front pack) as that might put any press points on your back not on your chest/pacemaker. Even try a duffel bag with a sling over one shoulder across your chest. Also try different clothing options under the pack.

Best wishes

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PostPosted: April 19th, 2022, 5:44 am 
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Location: Peterborough, Ontario Canada
In addition to all the good advice already given, you might find it interesting to see a presentation that Bill Ostrom made at the 2021 Wilderness and Canoe Symposium, recorded here: https://www.wcsymposium.com/content/fitting-your-canoe-pack-carry-heavy-loads-lightly. Among other things, Bill mentions techniques for how to load a pack, where to place heavy items etc. and he explains the reasons why this can have an impact on the relative comfort/discomfort that can be realized when trying to carry a given load.

I do like to have a tumpline on all my heavy packs, and find that it is helpful even if it only provides an occasional opportunity to shift the load around while portaging. The mere ability to switch between two or three carrying stances is more valuable to me than any one particular stance.


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PostPosted: April 19th, 2022, 10:42 pm 
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Mr Canoe Head wrote:
I do like to have a tumpline on all my heavy packs, and find that it is helpful even if it only provides an occasional opportunity to shift the load around while portaging. The mere ability to switch between two or three carrying stances is more valuable to me than any one particular stance.



excellent video thanks for sharing. also that's a really good point you made.

to be able to swap pack systems while walking that same port, is extremely valuable. if you think about it, when someone has an issue with a pack, their issue is generally about that pack over time , though it is not phrased that way. it is phrased as "that pack".

it's like a cup too hot to hold. yes, if you have only one hand available. if you have 2 to swap between, the cup is not hot anymore (on any one hand).


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2022, 12:28 pm 
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If a lot of portages are on my route I wear a light construction plastic hat. The portage strap fits in same place but the internal straps of the hat distributes and cushions the weight of the pack. When carrying the canoe when my shoulder s tire i lift off the yoke and carry canoe with the weight on the cushioned construction helmet. You can get said construction hats anywhere dirt cheap. It may work for you


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2022, 1:56 pm 
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D.B Cooper, that's a novel idea to me--wear a light construction plastic hat. Did you come up with it?

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PostPosted: April 20th, 2022, 2:05 pm 
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In I didn’t invent it it’s an old timer technique that is forgotten. I’m in my 60s probably older members here could comment on its history.As the hats are only ounces and cheap it’s worth a try for anyone


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2022, 4:26 pm 
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My Wabakimi and all my Ostrom Harnesses came with a tump. As that was years ago I have no idea if that is still true.
As others have said it's nice to shift load and on long ports I did use the tump from time to time but not very long. Just enough for a little break.


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PostPosted: April 20th, 2022, 4:30 pm 
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I recently purchased one of the newer Ostrom Wabakimi packs and they don't automatically come with a tump. Bill added one for me at a cost of $10. If you don't see the option on the site just ask him.


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PostPosted: April 21st, 2022, 9:38 am 
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Thanks for the comments and suggestions.
The learning curve on the recovery from my op has been interesting and constant adjustment.
The only pack I don't have with multiple straps is the one I loan out :lol:
I had hoped for a quicker recovery, but paddlers I know who had similar shoulder ops all said the same thing.
2 years. and they were right.
It is amazing how I had to work much more than just the shoulder and arm to get everything moving smoothly again.
Last year when I was allowed to paddled, it took a lot of effort and at times was not enjoyable, but it was great therapy for working all those tiny connector muscles.
This spring the few paddles I have been on, the balance and strength in strokes is back and again, paddling is very enjoyable.
And I know I am one of the lucky ones as many who have gone through this don't get the near perfect recovery as I have, and you still have to pay attention to the fatigue/stress on the repairs.
And there is no way I want to go back to the pain nightmare that I had when the injury occurred.
(fell off a ladder)
Wearing the light packs is getting better on my hikes, it is time to increase the weight a bit, but still will get a tump line for my heavier packs to take the stress off the shoulder.
Thanks again.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: May 10th, 2022, 8:44 am 
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Interesting follow up.
It is getting better for me as I paddle more again.
Having just finished 100ks of paddling/training to get trip & WW ready I have found that the paddling has really helped, I have found carrying my full camera hiking pack (approx. 25 lbs, it has all the bells and whistles for good support) no longer an issue.
I knew paddling strengthened muscles that are hard to activate via weight training, but very pleasantly surprised at the progress it helped with the pack issue.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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