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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 10:49 am 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Just curious. It used to be important to me, but now that I have to seek out people at home( I have no neighbors for much of the year) it no longer is.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 11:04 am 
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Solitude is one of the motivators for me. That said, in a remote spot, after several days or weeks of being alone, I must say I do welcome a chat with other paddlers that I may come across. I once shared a campfire with another solo paddler on a late August trip. We traded beers (a precious commodity as we'd only packed a few each) & some great conversation. A great memory.

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 11:12 am 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
It is... over the past 30 years, I've found some areas near here where the chance of seeing others is low. But there are also cottage lakes which can be interesting to paddle... seeing what vacationers do and the places they build at the water's edge, horror and fascination at the same time.

:wink:

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 11:39 am 
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Yes it is, but if someone of the same mind set comes along that is OK!
I enjoy just listening/watching the world, I am no longer in a hurry and have long lost the desire to cover great distances to say I did it. I like seeing the wildlife and the small, things, many of which are missed when you are in a hurry.
But I can find that on my local runs too!
In the city it is just a mind set to turn off the world for a bit.
Jeff

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 12:04 pm 
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Joined: August 16th, 2011, 8:02 pm
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Location: Edmonton area
The aloneness is a big part of the attraction of solo.

Our western culture is so full of trivial crap that too many people think are crucial issues, and the developing world is so full of the darker aspects of humanity that I become fed up and disgusted with people in general sometimes.

Going into wilderness areas alone helps me regain a balanced perspective on life.

I love thinking that what I'm seeing at any given moment hasn't really changed much since the last ice age, with no damage from vapid, greedy humans.

For me, being alone is akin to being naked, not that I'm a nudist.

It is liberating and novel to be shed of clothing/human company; to feel nature surround you more completely, to be able to more clearly see your strengths and weaknesses, to be more accepting of yourself.

With nudity/solitude you quickly also come to terms with your vulnerabilities. Temperature, sharp rocks beneath your feet, biting insects, thorn bushes, fear of getting lost, fear of things that go "woof" in the night, fear of injury, and so after a time it is very good to get dressed/return to people again; refreshed and nourished and reminded that we are hardwired to be social creatures for good reason.

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 12:35 pm 
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Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
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I don't mind seeing other paddlers now and then, but I like those stretches where I don't see anyone else for hours.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 1:01 pm 
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a good point. personally, tripping solo with a lot of other people around holds no appeal.
turtle


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 5:19 pm 
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Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
Yes and no, that's why I paddle solo but paddle with another solo (or two).

I very much enjoy the ability to do as I please all day but I also enjoy a compatible trip mate around camp.

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 5:56 pm 
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It used to be important to get away from the world in general and disheartening things from work in particular. Health issues have made me start looking at and dealing with my own mortality. I enjoy solitude as I have to do everything myself so for most of the time it keeps me planning and busy. In the quiet times I get to look inward.
So far I've had a good mix of buddies/good times/good trips with some really nice solos in between.

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 8:11 pm 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
I would like to do a river trip where vehicles are at the end. And soloists participate...whether or not they camp together can depend on the mood of the day. Sharing in the costs of a shuttle to the put in can save bucks..and your car is waiting for you no matter when you show up.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2013, 10:18 pm 
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I like to see no people at all. Nature is the only thing I am interested in seeing. I have hid rather than engage in conversation. I am lucky to live in an area that has lots of space and relatively few people. I try to time my adventures so as to avoid popular times and places and this generally works. I trip with friends sometimes and enjoy those trips too but to really connect with nature you need be alone.


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2013, 9:11 am 
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
I definitely appreciate solitude on a trip and need my time alone. I have come to realize that to comprehend an area I need ample time to simply sit and look and listen undisturbed. I don’t feel as immersed in an area hiking through or paddling through, no matter how slowly I go. I need to sit quietly and let it come to me.

That said, after sufficient time alone, 3 or 4 or 5 days, I sometimes welcome company of the right kind, other quiet people with a respectful ethic. I’ve shared a fire with folks well met towards the end of a trip and enjoyed hearing stories new to me and telling tales that all of my regular companions have often heard.

I also find a special joy in trips in which I start off solo and am joined by companions part way through, and on trips that start with a friend or two where we are joined by others along the way. The later offers an interesting change in group dynamics.

I’m hoping to head out for a solo trip in a day or two, and I’ll probably invite a couple of paddling pals to join me over the weekend towards the end, giving me a few days alone and a few days in company. If any of them can make it I’ll be delighted.

And if not I’ll be just as happy with the silence of solitude.


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2013, 9:50 am 
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I fully enjoy solitude, and not just when solo tripping. I have hunted alone, biked alone, hiked alone, and even spend alone time at home or work a lot too.

What I like about the solitude in the back country, just as with group activity there, is that it takes me away from the expectations I tend to give myself when back at home. Being away from these expectations, with no chance of doing anything about them, really helps set my mind at ease.

I also do not mind meeting up with others when solo, and chatting about the like minded things we are participating in. If wanted or needed, it is real easy to slip away to my own space again.

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PostPosted: April 1st, 2013, 3:40 pm 
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Location: Toronto
One of the interesting thing about "soloing" is that there seems to be less solitude when soloing. When travelling with a partner you dont really engage other people in conversation or meetings are fleeting , yet when Im alone there seems to be an unwritten licence to start a conversation with me , "Nice cedar strip" or the difficult question "are you alone?" sometimes I wonder if that question really means ..."can we rob you ?"...so I have met a LOT of people soloing , taken a lot of questions as well as been requested often to take couples pictures.

But on day 2 of a solo I get really really inspired. I dream of great things to do when I return and I appreciate the little things I usually take for granted. The overall solitude is great !...you listen better and you hear your own voice much louder.

Once while soloing in Lac Aux Sables I had seen others leaving portages and it was getting near dusk so I knew I was truly alone on one of the lakes. I wanted to swim but the landing at the portage didnt lend itself too well for a swim, so I paddled to a better spot and realized I had forgotten a towel .

So I jumped in naked and paddled back nude knowing the air was warm enough to dry myself off.
Truly liberating ! Yup solitude , gotta love it!


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2013, 5:49 am 
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Joined: January 27th, 2009, 7:44 am
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The solitude is really more than 'important' - it really is the reason that I do what I do. After a few days out, both me and my dog will instantly bristle at the sound of a human voice. People are the only thing we actually fear encountering out there. :-?

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