View topic - The benefits of a solo canoe - advice needed

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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 8:55 am 
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There is a book about canoe physics . Its older but still valid

http://www.greenval.com/TheShapeOfTheCanoe.html

If you are thinking of infused gunwales. try before you buy. I tend to rap knuckles on them when double blading ( very low angle stroke) and they are rough. I have had mine some 10 years and they get rougher from wearing off of the resin , exposing the kevlar carbon weave. Not a big deal.. need to re resin. You can also slide some PVC tubing ( clear ,flexible) over the gunwales,which we have started to do where the gunwales are in contact with the roof rack..Just short lengths. The wear is worse at thos e contact points due to microvibration of the boat at high highway speeds.

I have footbraces in several of my solos. If you spend any time sitting, they are almost essential to save your back from fighting to stay on the seat.

I have the slider in only one boat.. the dog boat.. Its handy then. Otherwise I find I pack pretty much the same in a all solos without the dog.


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 9:24 am 
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:o
Don't know what went on there :o
Went to edit my previous post and a bonus copy popped up ... :o :roll:
Looks like the internet gremlins are having a good time.

Well since I am here.

Totally agree with LRC on the footrests, single or double blade.
They will make it much easier to put the energy into the paddle and not into your shoulders.

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 11:48 am 
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Jeff, it’s interesting you feel less stress on your shoulders with a double blade. For me, I feel much greater stress. I suspect with a proper progression of training I could rectify that. I tried a pack canoe a couple years ago and wasn’t willing to entertain the idea of being dripped on with any regularity then, even when reduced by using a longer paddle. Having a single blade combined with a double could be a solution. Thanks for the advice. You convinced me to give it another shot.

LRC thanks for the book idea. I’ll check it out.

If I go with the infused gunwales I’ll definitely use the PVC tubing idea.

Has anyone tried the foot bar over the foot pegs or have an option on whether to opt for the 'white' bottom?


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 1:02 pm 
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From an appearance perspective, I sometimes think I should have omitted the bottom coat. But, I'm not gentle on my equipment and I'm glad I did get it now.

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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 1:49 pm 
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Generally when you scratch up the bottom, the scratches are white. The white layer is a camouflage of sorts. But some who rebuild scrap boats are using graphite bottoms so they are black bottomed.

The white is also a trim aid if it is laid out correctly and level... I have seen some which look like roller coasters. I'll not single any company out.

Just as in kayaking using a double well in a pack canoe requires cab forward stroke.. It does take practice to not bring that drip shower back.. Planting well forward and ending well forward eliminates that. Pack canoes do not require double blades always.. Some are wide enough that single blading isn't practical but others are fine with a short bent say 46 inches. But a pack canoe that can allow seating and kneeling is rare. Kneeling usually requires a more robust construction under the knees. Sitting spreads out stress more. ( Placid does do reinforcement while that boat is being built. I don't know about Swift)

My Rapid Fire and Monarch have pegs. But neither one are kneeling boats and my bottom is fairly low. Sitting higher as in stock solo canoe position, I like the footbar in my Nomad better. It allows a range of leg positions and moving around.


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 6:36 pm 
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Thanks lrc. I'm not interested in a pack canoe per se. It was just the boat I first tried a double blade with. Thanks for the pointers. I think I'd prefer the foot bar too.


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 7:38 pm 
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No I think you have presented what you want pretty well and its not a pack canoe. Sorry for any diversion.


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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 8:10 pm 
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Trim aid is a good point. I've had passerbys on the water comment on level trim (both times I thought it was a weird observation), and I often check it myself. I assume you're not talking Swift as I've noticed most of their lines are true.

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PostPosted: January 4th, 2016, 8:35 pm 
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my_self_reliance wrote:
Trim aid is a good point. I've had passerbys on the water comment on level trim (both times I thought it was a weird observation), and I often check it myself. I assume you're not talking Swift as I've noticed most of their lines are true.

No. I had a wavy trim line on a solo that was made by someone else I also respect. This was made years ago.. ( about 12) so may not be germane with laser levels now being commonly used. His latest models probably evolved into crisp level paint lines.

Back then it was a pencil and a measuring stick and a level floor..things have really changed!


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PostPosted: January 5th, 2016, 11:02 am 
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jlestevenson you will find that most dedicated solo boast are narrower making for a easier and more efficient paddle stroke.
For those following this thread you don't have to reach as far to the water which enables you to maintain better tech.

If you live near a sprint club with a paddle tank see if you can get some tech. instruction there. Most are equipped with mirrors which enables you to correct things that much easier.
Mention your shoulder issues so you can devise a tech. suited to you.

My upper hand push stoke is lower than when I raced for this reason. I try and keep it at shoulder height.
Also learning to release (open) the upper hand on the push also enables the muscles to relax between strokes.
It may be the continued death grip on the paddle shaft that will add to your issues.
That is something I see with many paddlers out there.

It is the same reason I prefer a "T" grip in a canoe paddle, I can release the grip and lift the paddle with my thumb on the recover part of the stroke.

Learning different tech. to relax the muscles will add to your enjoyment.

Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: January 5th, 2016, 4:52 pm 
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Thanks again everyone. Lots of useful tips.

The logical progression here is to consider the double blade paddle options. This was nicely covered back in Sept. under the heading "double blade paddle for solo canoe".


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PostPosted: January 10th, 2016, 11:41 am 
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I a have a Swift Osprey Kevlar infusion. I bought it used from someone on these forums.

It has a narrower beam and can seem very unstable unless you kneeling. I do use a kayak paddle on longer stretches and can get quite a good speed out of it .

One thing I have thought about adding , is foot rests. Without them I never feel like I'm getting a true power stroke thru to the paddle like I do in my kayak , especially with my feet and legs forward

The seat sits 8-9" off the bottom of the boat , so there's not much room to get feet under , so after an hour or two you need to put feet and legs forward , which then gives you that unstable feeling

It does track very well, and the 36lbs is easier on my ageing body when carrying it .Plus 90% of my paddling is solo .


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PostPosted: January 10th, 2016, 12:49 pm 
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I went up to Swift, south of Gravenhurst, this past Wednesday. If I did more whitewater than I do they would have suggested the Osprey. The Keewaydin seemed better suited for the type of paddling I do. I asked about a foot bar versus foot holds too. They too recommended them. The foot holds apparently have a much wider variety of settings vs the foot bar they have available. I'd hate to find the ideal setting happens to be between two not so perfect settings. Perhaps not a factor but I want to know before I go ahead with the bar. The bar seems to make more sense as it increases the positions my feet can apply pressure and increase stability. They're going to get back to me with more information next week.


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PostPosted: January 10th, 2016, 4:29 pm 
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Most foot bars are almost infinitely adjustable. You might be surprised that you don't feel a difference of half an inch.

I have had footpegs that were misaligned by that much and they felt equal to me. So the same ought to apply to footbars. Just a tidbit to store when they get back to you.

The only reason I change peg position is when changing seating height. You may find yourself, like me, not adjusting after you find a position you like. I haven't changed my footbar ( a Wenonah one with a homemade track on the side with holes and bolts..) ever.


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PostPosted: January 10th, 2016, 4:32 pm 
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Thanks lrc. You're a wealth of knowledge is greatly appreciated.


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