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PostPosted: January 19th, 2010, 8:52 pm 
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Eat them!

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =122699283


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PostPosted: January 19th, 2010, 9:04 pm 
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locally sourced sushi, or maybe an alternative to cajun catfish

have these bottom feeders been tested for mercury and PCBs?

the fish I mean, not the politicians


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PostPosted: January 19th, 2010, 10:45 pm 
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lost_patrol wrote:
have these bottom feeders been tested for mercury and PCBs?

While they are called carp … the are actually filter feeders (not bottom feeders). They grow to 80-100 lbs., eat about 1/4 their weight in plankton, algae, and other small organisms/day. This is why they would be so devastating to the Great Lakes ecosystem … what are all the other small fish, invertebrates (native or otherwise) supposed to eat? "Silverfin," huh … all from the guy who tried to sell us "nutria" meat (which as the radio story describes, is basically an overgrown rat). I won't be crossing my fingers.


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PostPosted: January 19th, 2010, 10:55 pm 
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what say you about this article?

Seems feeding is not so neat as baleen whales scooping up plankton.


http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/12 ... eat-em.php


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PostPosted: January 19th, 2010, 11:26 pm 
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I think I'd rather eat free range, no hormone, and organic Nutria than Great Lakes Silverfin.

Salmon live in much cleaner waters of the Great Lakes than the habors and other future feeding sites of the Silverfin … and PCB and other toxin levels are too high for a viable commercial salmon food fishery. And as plankton feeders, we'd pretty much be reduced to snagging for a sport fishery. I don't see any benefits to the Silverfin … but leave it to American capitalism to try and find a financial silver lining to an ecological disaster.


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2010, 12:43 pm 
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And as plankton feeders, we'd pretty much be reduced to snagging for a sport fishery. I don't see any benefits to the Silverfin … but leave it to American capitalism to try and find a financial silver lining to an ecological disaster.


Alewife were the previous plankton-feeding exotics invading the Great Lakes... they became so abundant that they fouled shorelines and beaches during their yearly die-offs. The solution was to stock large predatory pacific salmon, also exotics... the alewife numbers are down now and beaches stay clean.

With Asian carp, their large size makes stocking predators more difficult, but I wouldn't be surprised to see some fish culture specialist trying it and proposing such a maeasure if they ever became abundant.

Imagine the thrills that could be marketed by the sport fishing boat operators if some super fish were developed and stocked for asian carp control... charter boats advertising great white sharks or something similarly sized and adapted to fresh water... big powerful boats and saltwater tackle.

:roll:

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Last edited by frozentripper on January 20th, 2010, 12:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: January 20th, 2010, 12:44 pm 
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littleredcanoe wrote:


hmmm...
Parola said his role is unique because it puts private money behind a public problem. "This is being done without any taxpayer dollars," Parola said. "This is our money."

That guy's name is one letter different than the word, "payola".
:-?

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PostPosted: January 20th, 2010, 3:01 pm 
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frozentripper wrote:
Imagine the thrills that could be marketed by the sport fishing boat operators if some super fish were developed and stocked for asian carp control

Contact Mr. Payola ... we have an idea. Fly-fishing for Taimen, the monster salmonoid of Mongolia, is an adventure of a lifetime.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... hoto3.html

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The taimen, a voracious and cannibalistic predator, has earned the nickname "river wolf" because it hunts in packs.

"These fish will eat anything they can fit into their mouths—ducks, muskrats, even bats," said Zeb Hogan, who leads National Geographic Society's Megafishes Project, an effort to document the 20-some species of giant freshwater fish found around the world.


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2010, 4:13 pm 
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Old joke alert!

You've heard of the cowalskie? It's the latest wonder from the ingenious minds of our leading fish culturists. Anglers demand a fish that can jump, is real good to eat, grows to large size, and will pound any lure or plug put in front of it's nose.

So they've crossed a coho salmon, a walleye, and a muskellunge. They can produce F1 backcrosses that grow to 20 pounds (15 pounds of that is pure white meat fillets!) at age 2. I'm sure it will eat Asian carp, and once they teach it to swim, our problems will be over.


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2010, 8:47 pm 
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Hey... I heard that cowalskie joke way back in the early 70s.

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....once they teach it to swim, our problems will be over.



:rofl:

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PostPosted: October 7th, 2010, 8:40 pm 
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An update for those who are interested:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/201 ... -john-goss
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/stor ... =130400272

Glad to see other regional benefits to environmental remediation thrown in as benefits to dealing with Asian Carp issue. How anybody can view cleaning up the Chicago River and dealing with antiquated wastewater and sewage systems (the cheap and negligent practice of untreated effluent) as a bad thing is really beyond me.


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PostPosted: October 8th, 2010, 9:09 am 
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How anybody can view cleaning up the Chicago River and dealing with antiquated wastewater and sewage systems (the cheap and negligent practice of untreated effluent) as a bad thing is really beyond me.


The polluting sewer systems in older cities are being replaced but the process is ultra-expensive and because of that, the work goes slowly. Every street with combined sanitary and stormwater sewers needs to be torn up to get at the sewers and there's a great deal of disruption to residents and businesses. There's probably a NIMBY element to it as well which slows things down further.

It's been estimated that it will take over a hundred years to replace the combined sewer systems draining into the Great Lakes, with each city working on it's sewer systems independently, street by street. Maybe Chicago could get extra funds if it were shown to be a critical need.

Several days ago, the federal Department of Fisheries allocated $415 million to study the asian carp problem and to determine potential for damage.

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PostPosted: October 8th, 2010, 11:20 am 
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Well … re-reversing the flow of the Chicago River is no rainy day project, so we're talking big bucks and big projects for what could potentially be a catastrophic environmental problem for the trans-border region. Chicago is one of four cities in US that doesn't have a bacterial standard or disinfect its effluent from sewage treatment plants (as don't Kansas City, Memphis, and St. Louis). So we're a little behind the curve on this one. Frankly stated (see here for a paddler’s perspective), I'm surprised people have put up with it for so long (but then again, people get used to anything, don't they?). On our little beach along the lakeshore, a lifeguard comes and puts up a red flag whenever the e-coli count gets too high (usually after a heavy storm). Yellow means caution, avoid the water if you have any cuts or open sores, and take a shower when you get home. The city parks department is out daily with tractors grooming sand beaches to minimize e-coli count (a useful make work endeavor for sure). There has to be a better way (like preventing the problem in the first place).

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/08/opini ... ugman.html

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And right now, by any rational calculation, would be an especially good time to improve the nation’s infrastructure. We have the need: our roads, our rail lines, our water and sewer systems are antiquated and increasingly inadequate. We have the resources: a million-and-a-half construction workers are sitting idle, and putting them to work would help the economy as a whole recover from its slump. And the price is right: with interest rates on federal debt at near-record lows, there has never been a better time to borrow for long-term investment. But American politics these days is anything but rational.


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PostPosted: October 8th, 2010, 3:14 pm 
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idylwyld wrote:
Several days ago, the federal Department of Fisheries allocated $415 million to study the asian carp problem and to determine potential for damage.


Ughhh, it's CAD 415 thousand, not million. Not much for what is such a potentially devastating invader.

See http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/media/npress-c ... 03-eng.htm

Kinguq


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PostPosted: October 8th, 2010, 4:50 pm 
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kinguq wrote:
Ughhh, it's CAD 415 thousand, not million. Not much for what is such a potentially devastating invader.

Wow … and over two years no less. In the 49th Ward of Chicago, which is my neighborhood, we have a participatory budgeting process for discretionary funds (a process where residents propose, research, campaign, and then vote on proposals). We basically allocated the same amount last year for a traffic signal near a neighborhood school.


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