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PostPosted: October 21st, 2010, 10:47 am 
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http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-o ... le1766645/

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PostPosted: October 21st, 2010, 6:10 pm 
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If only Canada would do the same with their wild places.

Not likely to happen. But one can wish right?

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PostPosted: October 21st, 2010, 6:18 pm 
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Having lived in Norway for over 8 years, I can say that there are lots of similarities to Canada and that we have quite a bit in common. That said, and not wanting to generalize too much, I found the Norwegian attitude to nature and conservation to be more utilitarian and in a sense more realistic than that typical in Canada.

For example, most Norwegians are proud that their country continues commercial whaling, one of only two countries (the other being Iceland; Japan catches whales under a research permit) that continue to do so. There is not a conservation issue with the stocks being hunted, the takes are sustainable, so why should they not do so? I would guess that most Canadians would be appalled if we resumed commercial whaling, and would probably not even know that we are whaling now (beluga, narwhal, bowhead).

On the other hand, there is a ridiculously small number of wolves in southern Norway, probably <30 animals, and even these are subject to periodic culls to keep the population in control. There are very few bears and most that are seen end up being culled. Much of inland northern Norway is used as reindeer and sheep pasture. There is very little land left that has not been used or culturally affected in some way.

Interesting too that Norway has had a carbon tax for many years, and gas prices are about 2.5 x those in Canada, even though Norway is a major oil producer. Try to get away with that here (Oh wait, Stephan Dion did try that).

The valuation tool looks useful, and it is about time that these values started to be considered seriously by economists.

med vennlig hilsen,

Kinguq.


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PostPosted: October 21st, 2010, 9:42 pm 
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Joined: January 11th, 2009, 6:49 am
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kinguq wrote:
Having lived in Norway for over 8 years, I can say that there are lots of similarities to Canada and that we have quite a bit in common. That said, and not wanting to generalize too much, I found the Norwegian attitude to nature and conservation to be more utilitarian and in a sense more realistic than that typical in Canada.

For example, most Norwegians are proud that their country continues commercial whaling, one of only two countries (the other being Iceland; Japan catches whales under a research permit) that continue to do so. There is not a conservation issue with the stocks being hunted, the takes are sustainable, so why should they not do so? I would guess that most Canadians would be appalled if we resumed commercial whaling, and would probably not even know that we are whaling now (beluga, narwhal, bowhead).

On the other hand, there is a ridiculously small number of wolves in southern Norway, probably <30 animals, and even these are subject to periodic culls to keep the population in control. There are very few bears and most that are seen end up being culled. Much of inland northern Norway is used as reindeer and sheep pasture. There is very little land left that has not been used or culturally affected in some way.

Interesting too that Norway has had a carbon tax for many years, and gas prices are about 2.5 x those in Canada, even though Norway is a major oil producer. Try to get away with that here (Oh wait, Stephan Dion did try that).

The valuation tool looks useful, and it is about time that these values started to be considered seriously by economists.

med vennlig hilsen,

Kinguq.

Excellent insight. thanks for the post.

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