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PostPosted: November 27th, 2010, 11:43 am 
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For any interested in protecting biodiversity and natural areas, adding your name to the charter can be done here:

http://www.ontarionature.org/protect/ca ... vision.php

Quote:
The United Nations has declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity. We are very concerned that as 2010 comes to a close the momentum and attention of this year will give way to other issues leaving the importance of biological diversity in the shadows once again.

Ontario Nature has been protecting and advocating for biodiversity for close to 80 years. We believe that the loss of biological diversity is one of the most important issues facing us today and in the future. That is why we are ending 2010 with a special campaign, a 20/20 vision for biodiversity in Ontario.

At the end of 2010, we will submit this charter with your signature and thousands of others to the Premier of Ontario and the Ministers of Natural Resources, Environment and Northern Development, Mines and Forestry. We’ve outlined exactly what the Province needs to do to stop the loss of biodiversity by 2020.

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PostPosted: November 27th, 2010, 11:55 am 
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:clap:
Worth the effort!
This group loaned support for the NWPA very early on and freely spread the word on this and other causes.
Jeff

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Last edited by jedi jeffi on November 27th, 2010, 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: November 27th, 2010, 5:14 pm 
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I'm in! :thumbup:

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PostPosted: November 27th, 2010, 6:10 pm 
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It's hard to argue against the sentiment. We probably all care about maintaining biodiversity. But how does one define the amount of "area that fully represents the biological diversity of Ontario's land and water"? How much area are they talking about? How much of taxpayers money are we talking about in "adequate funding"? Whatever it takes?

I find it hard to sign my name to something with no details.


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PostPosted: November 27th, 2010, 11:19 pm 
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Prov gov'ts have watered down enviro laws and species at risk laws, close off local debate on projects MNR is basicly declared a joke by the OMB The feds water down the NWPA, EA laws fisheries legistlation, climate change while at the same time throw out PR reports on how much they are doing for the enviro... :cry:
As per the poll I put out a few days ago at least this group has shown some intestinal fortitude to fight back. :thumbup: :clap:
As per funding, ask how much it is going to cost our kids to try and fix things,
the governments talk about jobs, how bout the tens of thousands of jobs that deal with and depend on the outdoors, being in a relatively healthy state.
You must include a wide variety of manufacturing that make equipment various outdoors people use, the service industry including lodges, resturantsm stores, people spend alot of money somewhere in planning their outdoor time.
Don't want to start a urinary match, but the powers that be are depending on points of view like yours to get some short term gain.
Take a look at what is happening in the US with Queen Sarah :o
Public opinion is molded with hate and fear
Fear of more taxes... hate that guy
Fear of job loss...hate that guy..
even though the gutting of past policies is what set it up..
and it will be neat to see what happens to those that made a fourtune on the inside gold info in BC
but what the heck so what if someone made millions on the backs of the little guys...
According to John Baird "it was for the enviroment"
What about the little guys cost, let alone the tax money it is going to cost for what is soon to be as big as Chretian's hearings....
:evil: :evil: :evil:
Sooner or later somesone is going to pay.
Just look at the monies that where paid out (and still being paid out) when the fisheries collapsed on the east coast, (and now the west coast with the salmon colapse) because of poor planning and policies.
You just have to look at the agreements enviro acitivists have made in some areas with agreements made with industry.
Sometimes a fair negotiation is all that is needed, and that is surely lacking right now,
And signing your name to show the government that Canadians truly care for the enviroment.
Just ask some of the little groups that have been fighting to try and protect and keep access rights to various outdoor areas, the frustration level is very high becasue of the lack of support not only from the big enviro groups but also the way the governments are playing the game.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: November 28th, 2010, 12:18 am 
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Sorry Jeff:
I understand your allegiance to a group that supported your cause. I happen to live in Northern Ontario's boreal forest and resource based forestry industry has provided a living for many members of my family. The amount or percentage of area that Ontario Nature wants to preserve is close to home for me. It has a personal implications. I'm asking for clarification before I provide my support. How much area or what percentage are we talking about? I'm sorry, but that is very important to me, so please don't lecture.


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PostPosted: November 28th, 2010, 9:59 am 
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JF,

Quote:
...I happen to live in Northern Ontario's boreal forest... How much area or what percentage are we talking about?


I'd like to see more info myself but we're still early in the process... the Ontario Nature initiative is aimed at changing government policy generally - Ontario is a large land area and detailing specific locations and areas into the charter might not be possible at this time.

It's a bigger-picture, broadly-based policy recommendation to the premier and several ministries that affect biodiversity and land use (Natural Resources, Environment and Northern Development, and Mines and Forestry). There may be specific places identified near you, and there may be surveys and options being sorted out to determine which natural areas will need protection.

There's a general reference to boreal forests and ecosystems here in this PDF from the ON page, still general and without getting into specifics.

http://www.ontarionature.org/protect/ca ... harter.pdf

Staff at your district office MNR may have info on specific locations where protection measures may be carried out (the word was out here long before the large conservation reserves were formally protected in the 90s) . It's most likely still early times to have all the protected natural areas identified and listed with any certainty... my opinion only, without having seen any specific material on the matter.

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PostPosted: November 28th, 2010, 10:12 am 
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They not only supported me but are also more willing to give up contacts than many big groups, without the "request" for membership.
the trouble is biodiversity is not a percentage.
They are also talking about saving species in southern Ontario.
And I understand that we need resources from Northern Ontario, but that may mean driving up the costs by having more enviromentally sound practices, such as treating the tailings ponds and waste so they don't post a hazard to those downstream.
or having sound logging practices.
When the Prov Lib, announced putting aside the percentage of the boreal forest in the spring Mike Hudak used the ignorance of the southern Ont. folk by saying that the Liberals where turning Northern ontario into a giant park and it was going to cost jobs..
Again using fear.
As with the collapsed climate talks, there will be a big song and dance saying they are striving to com to an agreement.
But in the end you and me and our kids are going to pay.
I really don't like the way the politicians are using the fear factor to play one group against the other.
You and me understand there needs to be a balanced look at this so that there is long term benefits for the north.
I just wish they (the politicians) had some true vision.
That OMB decision stating the MNR's problems in the quarry in Caledon will effect decisions in the north because now some southern ONt, super lefty can use that ruling in court as evidence of a flawed system.
And that will hurt your jobs up there a whole lot more,
This group vs that group and nothing really being done to preserve jobs or biodiversity.
And we still get to pay the bill.
Sorry for the lecture :roll:
but others need to see the middle through good debate.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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PostPosted: November 28th, 2010, 11:27 am 
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JF wrote:
I happen to live in Northern Ontario's boreal forest and resource based forestry industry has provided a living for many members of my family. The amount or percentage of area that Ontario Nature wants to preserve is close to home for me. It has a personal implications.

Hey JF … important concerns indeed, especially for people who's livelihood is connected to natural resource development in Ontario.

It might be worth finding a way to support the work of Ontario Biodiversity Council, or maybe one of the specific stakeholders that represent your interests better (rather than the charter of a specific environmental group … who is also a member of the Council). The Ontario Biodiversity Council is a coalition of members made up of industry, government, NGO, aboriginal, and environmental stakeholders for region. Membership includes Ontario Forest Industries Association, Federation of Agriculture, Ontario Power Generation, Cottagers' Associations, Sand and Gravel Assoc., Ontario Mining Association, and more. Anything of this sort is about the credibility of the process, and not the specifics of an individual plan (in my view). And I don't know enough about process to determine if it is credible or not, but it sounds like they are just getting started. You wouldn't have industry groups at the table if they felt their interests were not going to be heard.

The Forest Industry Association sits on the Council, and says this about their membership:
Quote:
The Ontario Biodiversity Council was created to guide the implementation of "Protecting what sustains us...Ontario's Biodiversity Strategy". Council believes that all citizens, communities and sectors of society can play an important role in conserving the province's biodiversity and making sure that our use of natural resources is sustainable.

And for a southern perspective: there's absolutely zero forest industry in many areas of the US where the forest industry used to dominate the economy … so I'm fairly confident in saying we failed the test of economic and environmental sustainability.


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PostPosted: November 28th, 2010, 10:19 pm 
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I guess I will keep paying my annual dues to the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.


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PostPosted: November 29th, 2010, 11:40 am 
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Unrelated news, still shows a trend taking place in Canada that IIRC ranks first internationally (or close to it) in protecting natural areas.

Climate change initiatives are a different story but some have said that if binding international climate agreements aren't possible at this time (as is being reported on from Cancun today) then at least do something to protect biodiversity and natural areas, while the climate strategy is being worked out.

Quote:
WWF-Canada nominates Parks Canada for prestigious international award

Banff, Alberta, November 25, 2010 -- The recent dramatic growth of Canada’s national park system has earned Parks Canada a prestigious Gift to the Earth Award nomination by World Wildlife Fund-Canada. Darcy Dobell, Pacific Region vice-president for WWF-Canada, presented the nomination to Parks Canada today at the celebration of the 125th birthday of Banff, Canada’s first national park.

“Canada’s national park system has seen unprecedented growth in the past few years. It is a true honour to be recognized by WWF-Canada for this amazing conservation achievement,” said Canada’s Environment Minister John Baird, from Ottawa. “Canada’s world-class national park system is without a doubt Canada’s gift to the world and to future generations, and I’m pleased to receive this nomination on behalf of the people of Canada.”

Gifts to the Earth are recognized by WWF’s world headquarters in Geneva, spotlighting outstanding demonstrations of environmental leadership and globally significant contributions to the protection of the living world. Each “Gift” represents an important success for one or more of WWF global priorities.

“We are pleased to nominate Parks Canada for WWF’s Gift to the Earth,” said Gerald Butts, President and CEO of WWF-Canada. “As WWF's highest accolade, this recognizes Parks Canada’s many significant conservation achievements, including its globally significant track record in creating protected areas and reintroducing endangered species. We are proud to work with Parks Canada and look forward to the next 100 years of Parks Canada conservation efforts.”

The Parks Canada system has tremendous growth momentum. In the first hundred years of the system, Canada set aside about 277,000 km2 of lands and waters. In the past four years alone, the government has taken steps that will add nearly 90,000 km2 to the existing lands and waters administered by Parks Canada - a 30 percent increase. Among this growth is the six-times expansion of Nahanni national park last year and the creation of the Lake Superior and Gwaii Haanas national marine conservation areas.

“The Gift to the Earth nomination is an incredible way to conclude an incredible year - the 125th anniversary of Canada’s first national park, in Banff,” said Parks Canada CEO Alan Latourelle. “It also sets the stage for another great Canadian celebration - Parks Canada’s centennial in 2011, making it the first, and finest, national park service in the world.”



http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/cp-nr/release_ ... &andor1=nr

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PostPosted: December 2nd, 2010, 7:02 pm 
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Back last spring we purchased a small track of land right across from the Cold Stream Conservation Area just a little North West of London. As we prepare to build our new log residence and store. My first concern was for both Cold Stream and our property. So to reestablish a grater percentage of Carolinian Bio diversity with Natural Native Flora species to this area. We also first joined the local group, Enviro Friends of Cold Stream who manage the Conservation Area..

But something with some of our conversations efforts with both the Conservation Authority and the Ministry was no right. I met with some resistance.

Well talk about a fools errand...... After researching native Carolinian stocked nurseries so that we could maintain the correct bio diversity in our forest enhancement program. One such employee questioned our efforts. He made me laugh...... :doh: Has anyone checked out the nursery stock carried by the Conservation Authority's. You'd be surprised at the amount Non-Native stock they are still using in their tree plantation.

In short I'm going to beat to my own drum as we try to enhance our Carolinian forest as a legacy for future generations to
enjoy.

American Horse Chestnut, Tulip Trees, Wood Poppies, Pow Pow trees just to name a few.

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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2010, 7:50 am 
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Good going on restoring native species, Alan. I thought Conservation Authorities would have been on board by now.

Quote:
Has anyone checked out the nursery stock carried by the Conservation Authority's. You'd be surprised at the amount Non-Native stock they are still using in their tree plantation.


Maybe they're planting trees that are not native to Carolinian forests and are typical from more northern forests? Are these species native to eastern North America?

Municipal park landscaping is often done with non-native exotics.... eg. High Park in Toronto still has some areas where exotics are being used in the landscaping, in spite of the public consulations that resulted in restoring the natural native vegetation.

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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2010, 8:45 am 
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I am curious Alan. Can you please tell me what non-native species the CAs are planting?


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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2010, 3:08 pm 
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Black Cedar, Hybrid poplar, Norway Spruce, European Larch, Colorado Spruce, Austrian Pine. :evil:

Its not just the varieties, its their method or style of planting that they are using. You often see planted by the Authorities on their land and on private land these plots of one variety.

You would think in this day that these conservation authorities would plant mixed native trees in their plantation programs to maintain native bio diversity. :doh:

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