View topic - Hydrolines rerouted - to avoid impact on Wabakimi caribou

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PostPosted: December 10th, 2010, 7:46 am 
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I am suspicious that the corridor will travel up the east side of Nipigon to the Ring of Fire.
I asked a person who had been involved with berating the claim stakers up there about the mess they were leaving around their base camps and I was told the electricity for the Ring of Fire was not going to come up via Lake Nipigon. That was 6+ months ago.
But changing the Pickle Lake requirement over to Dryden may be a game changer for the Ring of Fire requirements. If it is, no one in the bureaucracy will be talking about it for a while until it becomes closer to being "fait accompli".

My guess is that it will be heading to Fort Hope and then over to the Attawapiskat to the Ring of Fire. Crossing many rivers along it's route.


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PostPosted: December 10th, 2010, 8:10 am 
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Erhard wrote:
Ouch!
Let me see whether I can find out what makes the CPAWS folks so optimistic...
That would be great. Giving it a little more thought (before reading Mac's post above) … perhaps there is a new "secret" plan for a transmission line "re-route" on the east side of Nipigon that follows the proposed railroad route to Ring of Fire (Exton to McFauld's Lake). This makes a lot of sense to me, you could connect up the new energy sources, provide grid power to Ring of Fire, and avoid sensitive caribou habitat and wilderness areas surrounding Wabakimi all together? It would be an expensive route (with fewer communities along the way).


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PostPosted: December 10th, 2010, 9:03 am 
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The environment minister is pounding the table in Cancun over hydroelectric power in providing green solutions to climate warming... so if there is an opportunity to reroute the hydro corridor, it may be taken to facilitate hydro damming elsewhere... but who really knows at this point except government and corporate insiders?


Quote:
Baird does about-face, lauds provinces' initiatives

Climate summit. Minister touts cuts in greenhouse gases

By MIKE DE SOUZA, December 10, 2010 5:08 AM

John Baird says it's 'ridiculous' that many Americans don't consider hydro renewable energy.

One week after singling out provinces for more talk than action to fight climate change, federal Environment Minister John Baird used the world stage at the United Nations climate change summit to praise them for showing leadership.

"Non-emissions electricity generation is bountiful in Quebec, Newfoundland, Ontario and Manitoba and is an important part of the solution in North America," Baird said in Canada's address to delegates at the summit.

...

"Furthermore, we continue our discussions with the United States to highlight the real importance of large hydroelectric power as an important renewable energy source and a contributor to reducing greenhouse gas emissions."

Baird said he decided to raise the point after a bilateral meeting at the summit with Quebec Environment Minister Pierre Arcand.

"Many American states don't recognize hydro (electricity) as renewable, and that's ridiculous," Baird said yesterday at a news conference.

"It's zero emissions. It can play a part of the solution."


http://www.montrealgazette.com/business ... z17iUAdGdO





... and I agree it's really all about money, there are lots of other ways to ensure that corporate elites get the means to finance their nature-destroying development projects.




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PostPosted: December 10th, 2010, 11:46 am 
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I dont have much to add except that looking at this map dovetails with the evidence of prospecting and base camp mess we found just outside of the western boundaries of Wabakimi PP.

There were quite a few yellow numbered bags and a lot of junk.

page 13


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 12:15 am 
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Kim: Thank for digging up this latest news. Now, all we have to do is to figure out the difference between, or significance of, the "integrated" vs. "independent" options as outlined on p.13 of this September 10th report as quoted below.
Quote:
Two Transmission Options to Address Developments in the Northwest
1. “Integrated” Option: Nipigon to Little Jackfish to Pickle Lake
2. “Independent” Option: Nipigon to Little Jackfish and Ignace(or other termination) to Pickle Lake
• The choice between these two options is impacted by the timing of the developments

At first glance, it would seem that "integrated" suggests that one transmission route would satisfy both the need to integrate the proposed 100MW project on the Little Jackfish River and the need to develop a high-voltage transmission line to Pickle Lake (and beyond?).

If this supposition holds, then it follows that the "independent" option suggests that the two needs are satisfied by separate or "independent" transmission lines. In any case, I doubt that either of these options will satisfy the need for a power supply to the Ring of Fire.

I am surprised that there's not been more vocal objection to routing the power developed by the proposed Little Jackfish project down the east side of Nipigon instead of through the communities of Armstrong and Gull Bay and on down either Highway 527 or the Black Sturgeon Road on the west side of Lake Nipigon to link to the provincial grid.


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 11:03 am 
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Erhard wrote:
Let me see whether I can find out what makes the CPAWS folks so optimistic...
Hi Erhard ... I'm curious when you are going to share your news? Looks like we both talked to the same person. There is good news on this story, I've been waiting for you to post?

From what I can say in summary ... there was a great deal of negotiation with Hydro One and the Ministry on this, and CPAWS Wildlands League and members were told that caribou considerations played a role. We should savor the decision (not only on the merits, such as a lower cost option for the transmission line, but also on benefits to caribou habitat and fewer linear corridors around Wabakimi). I'm told Hydro One was strongly advocating for the eastern route, but it was ultimately a decision made by MEI and supported by Cabinet. This doesn't mean Little Jackfish or a transmission route on the east side of Nipigon are off the table. We're urged to stay on top of issue, but in this this instance ... cooler, wiser heads prevailed.

I think it sounds to me like they did some great work on this, which only makes it more important to stay on top of the issue in the future (to protect the environmental gains that were made here), but also ensure that future energy development, transmission and mining take place in a reasonable and thoughtful way. I suppose that's the lesson of any achievement of this sort, any gains are always temporary (and are only as good as the people who continue to remember and advocate for them in the future).


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 5:05 pm 
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It's utterly amazing how fast change is coming to the North. This Ring of Fire development, just by its location, will forever change the character of a vast expanse of wilderness. Think of it--bridging the Albany and Attawapiskat Rivers... These are remote rivers, an introduction to the timeless North for many paddlers-- that first plunge into real wilderness after the relatively manicured paddles of the managed parklands of the Near North.

This upcoming fragmentation of one of the world's great roadless areas
should be headline news. And yet, it's barely noticed.


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 8:10 pm 
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ghommes wrote:
Quote:
This upcoming fragmentation of one of the world's great roadless areas
should be headline news. And yet, it's barely noticed.


Yeah!..... and this is a canoeing forum. :-? You would think it would mean something.


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 8:38 pm 
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It sure as hell means a lot to me. The only image of that landscape my kids will know will be through my trip journals and slides. :(


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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 10:19 pm 
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Just getting to the ring of fire for mining has the creation of a rail road crossing the major water ways of the Ogoki, Albany and others. This is just the start of the damage in addition to the hydro-line being proposed.

Maybe I missed this but it has equal concern IMHO

Mining/Rail Ring of Fire

Barry

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PostPosted: December 11th, 2010, 10:51 pm 
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search of forums for "ring of fire"....

two recent threads:

viewtopic.php?f=21&t=35377

viewtopic.php?f=107&t=36563&p=341101

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PostPosted: December 12th, 2010, 11:03 am 
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idylwyld wrote:
Hi Erhard ... I'm curious when you are going to share your news? Looks like we both talked to the same person. There is good news on this story, I've been waiting for you to post?


Sorry guys, a bit late.

I did get a reply from Anna Baggio, of the WildslandsLeague.
Quote:
Hi Erhard, we fought and so did hundreds of our members for over a year so that alternatives to this line would be considered. Hydro One was particularly intransigent about it and was bent on going up the east side of Lake Nipigon and the east side of Wabakimi to Pickle Lake.

It seems cooler, wiser heads prevailed at Energy and now the line will be rerouted. This is a victory because it makes sense for the environment and the economy. Energy didn’t close the door entirely on a line in the distant future in the Nipigon area only. Keep in mind no case has been made for Little Jackfish yet and this project has had many iterations. It goes back at least 20 years. In the meantime, the province’s priorities for transmission to Pickle Lake are now NOT going to destroy caribou habitat and cut off habitat in Wabakimi from the intact forests further north. You should celebrate.

At the same time, we will have to be vigilant for any new linear disturbances being proposed of course anywhere in the near north and far north. If the government chooses to consider a new line in the Nipigon area in the next 10 or 20 years, we’ll have to pick up the fight again (or our sucessors will!). This is to be expected. We pushback on bad projects. Sometimes we win. This time we did.

This is good news.


I think you folks hit the key issues threatening the area. But - to use Bill Mason's image of the crumbling ice floe - as we watch it gradually crumble at the edges, we should be conscious when we have succeeded in stemming the decay in some spot. It shows us that "resistance is NOT futile". And to read between Anna's lines: we'll be asked to keep supporting organizations like hers as the conflict up there keeps growing...

By the way, this shows you the tremendous importance of Phil's project. A documented canoe route is a stake in the ground - no less important than a mining claim - that a ministry must respect.

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PostPosted: December 12th, 2010, 12:46 pm 
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By the way, this shows you the tremendous importance of Phil's project. A documented canoe route is a stake in the ground - no less important than a mining claim - that a ministry must respect.

Thanks for the credit, Erhard!

While not directly related to this thread, CCR readers should be aware that the Draft Plan for the new 2011-2021 Lake Nipigon Forest was released last Friday (December 10th). I am currently studying it line-by-line as it will seriously impact many of the Crown land canoe routes that provide strategic access to Wabakimi as well as vital links to other protected places such as Kopka River Provincial Park. I will post a summary of my findings on the Environmental Issues forum when I've completed my review.


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PostPosted: December 12th, 2010, 1:23 pm 
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It's utterly amazing how fast change is coming to the North. This Ring of Fire development, just by its location, will forever change the character of a vast expanse of wilderness. Think of it--bridging the Albany and Attawapiskat Rivers... These are remote rivers, an introduction to the timeless North for many paddlers-- that first plunge into real wilderness after the relatively manicured paddles of the managed parklands of the Near North.

This upcoming fragmentation of one of the world's great roadless areas
should be headline news. And yet, it's barely noticed



Something that seems especially troublesome is the speed with which the McGuinty government is pushing the Ring of Fire development forward. According to news reports, there is no time to carry out scientific surveys or full environmental assessments. It seems that government policy is full speed ahead to get the mines going, whatever the cost.

Another page from the website at Barry's link states that three parks will be cut by the proposed Ring of Fire railroad along with ninety rivers and streams.

Quote:
Mining claims along the entire route secured the corridor. The route would ride on the glacial eskers that start south of the Albany River and make for ideal track bed.

“It’s really a blessing of nature that these sand ridges exist,” said Ojard. The route represents “the shortest path that takes advantage of the best ground.”

Building the line would cut through three provincial parks and involve 90 water crossings ranging from creeks to major rivers like the Albany and Attawapiskat.


http://www.republicofmining.com/2010/06 ... -ian-ross/


Hydro corridors and the electricity they bring to northern communities are what make diverse economic development in the landscape possible, including mining, logging, roading and more river damming for hydro generation.

Besides Pickle Lake, there seems to be a need being created for another hydro corridor to the Ring of Fire area. Nothing certain yet as described in the report below, but there's this along with other news of hydro needs in NW Ontario (Greenstone is in the area east of Lake Nipigon):

Quote:
He said another omission in Tuesday’s update was any planned upgrades in the north end of Greenstone, which could presumably become a connecting point for a new hydro corridor leading to a future Ring of Fire chromite mine.

The deposit is believed to hold the largest source of chromite — a key ingredient in stainless steel — in North America.

Cleveland-based Cliffs Natural Resources said it wants to build the mine by 2015.

“I don’t know how you can put in the millions of investment required (for a Ring of Fire mine) when you don’t a have a stable hydro system,” said Angus.


http://www.chroniclejournal.com/content ... -bay-plant

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