View topic - Dutch ovens and reflector ovens

It is currently June 22nd, 2021, 2:43 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: December 13th, 2020, 4:00 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 21st, 2020, 2:09 am
Posts: 39
Location: British Columbia
Does anyone have much experience with either of these? I'm looking at maybe trying out the GSI aluminum dutch oven. Any insight as to weather the anodized coating holds up or is worth it?

Reflector ovens look interesting too. Both bring more options for cooking which is good for someone who's a bit of a...I guess foodie.

just wondering who's used them and if they're good or more of a pain. I'm sure they both have a learning curve.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 13th, 2020, 5:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: January 3rd, 2010, 5:59 pm
Posts: 222
Location: Kanata
Hello,
I have the 10 inch GSI dutch oven, and love it. I've used it a lot over the past 6 or 7 years and it shows no sign of wear. For a group of 4 people it is the prefect size for making lasagna, prime rib, cake, bannock, muffins, or just deep frying fish, making pancakes - anything you can think of.
Just made a reflector oven, will test it out next week. Not sure how it will fit into the food system yet?

rab

rab


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 13th, 2020, 5:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 26th, 2008, 8:48 pm
Posts: 94
Bit of a broken recording here, Banks Frybake as well. Absolutely the best, but you pay for it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 13th, 2020, 7:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 4:35 pm
Posts: 354
While some of the info is dated there's some gold in these threads....

My search https://www.myccr.com/search.php?query= ... 0&search=1
and some that caught my eye
https://myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=7448
https://myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=32964
https://myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=16090
https://myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=28684

cheers


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: December 14th, 2020, 10:18 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 21st, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 540
Location: Woodstock, Ontario Canada
After having a outback oven which worked pretty good , we switched over to a reflector oven. I really like our reflector oven, it packs up using hardly any space and weight in the pack, we just bake in a fry pan we already take . You have to have a decent fire pit which quiet often means cleaning out a fire pit and sometimes opening up one side of the pit to set your reflector oven on. I find we usually clean the fire pit anyway to get rid of unburned garbage the usually resides there. Makes me feel better cooking food over a clean pit.

_________________
Listen to advice and accept instruction, and in the end you will be wise. Prov. 19:20


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 26th, 2021, 7:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 17th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Peterborough, Ontario Canada
I use a small Lodge cast iron (!) dutch oven when weight & bulk are not a concern, and a reflector when I'm trying to pack more compactly. If you're cooking something with a lot of moisture like a stew or chili, a dutch oven can be somewhat set-and-forget; as long as you have the right amount of coals under and over it, you can do other things and just check in on it periodically to add coals. It will also hold a finished meal nicely warm if left near the fire.

I once made a reflector oven which worked well but was a bit of a pain to transport and assemble, mostly because of my poor design. I now use the Svante Freden oven, which is a really elegant folding design. It will easily take an 8'-9" round pan such as the frypan from a Trangia set. Canadian Outdoor Equipment Company sells them, and Svante publishes the plans at http://www.sf-canoe.se/en/reflector-oven/ if you want to make your own. If you are cooking for more than two, you may wish to consider a larger reflector. Reflectors seem to require a bit more frequent tending to keep the fire just right. I find that rotating the pan is often helpful. Depends on what you're cooking of course.

I like both of them but must caution that I really enjoy cooking whether at home or by the fire. So I'm not objective when it comes to practicality; I'm rarely in a rush when cooking with these. Either can be used for baking.

Photos show the lid of the cast iron dutch oven inverted to serve as a frying pan, and the purchased reflector. I don't have any experience with the GSI dutch oven.

If you're an outdoors enthusiast and a foodie I bet you could enjoy either or one of each, depending on your modes of travel.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 2nd, 2021, 6:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 8th, 2005, 1:18 pm
Posts: 37
Location: Owen Sound/Peru/Bali and Nepal
Great question. Generally I bring three cooking options and have for years.
Dutch oven. Any Dutch oven that has a good lid with a decent rim. Just so you can build a “twiggy fire” on top so bake anything.
Reflector Oven. I have used and gone through so many designs before I found what I think is the perfect oven. I found the design in an old old book. Made it myself and it has proved to be fantastic. If I could figure how to post a pic I would show you.
Mini Pressure cooker. I have always brought one when climbing at altitude and it found a home in my kitchen kit for canoeing. Perfect for quick meals and saves a ton of fuel. Also since the lid locks closed its great for hauling leftovers around.

All three of these option require practice but once mastered there is no going back. Well worth the weight and space they consume. Enjoy and buon appetito


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 6th, 2021, 1:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: March 21st, 2013, 11:30 am
Posts: 137
Location: Minden, NV USA
I have been cooking with Dutch ovens for 40 years. They are very forgiving and easy to use with some practice. I usually bring an aluminum dutch for canoe trips. It is the small one with no legs. I use it on a two burner stove for everything. On a fire I just support it with some small rocks. I baked a cake for my 65th birthday on a river trip. They can make pizza, stir fry, stews, and everything else. I hate foil pouch food.

Have some friends over and practice in the back yard before a trip. I like to have tent parties and cook in dutch ovens in the winter. A canvas tent like a wall tent with a stove or a tipi with a fire is perfect.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 6th, 2021, 4:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 6th, 2004, 5:46 pm
Posts: 117
Pizza.....mmmm


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: March 6th, 2021, 4:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 26th, 2020, 5:23 pm
Posts: 1
Both are amazing, the only bit of opinion I would have would be to make sure the Dutch Oven is cast iron. Yes, it is heavier but I think the proof is in the pudding with final cooking results! Love using both


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 21st, 2021, 4:34 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 16th, 2011, 8:02 pm
Posts: 283
Location: Edmonton area
I made an ultralight folding reflector oven out of a disposable aluminum oven drip tray from a dollar store, 2 ACCO fasteners for binding stationary, a couple of small metal grommets, 2 kabab skewers, and a home sewn case.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

It weighs a few ounces, cost less than $5, folds flat and small, and using stones to raise the rear so that the baking tray is level, it bakes a 2 person bannock in about 15 minutes or less. I got the idea from a YouTube video. I'm made others and given them away. This one has been used maybe a dozen times.
Cheers all.

_________________

Ubique



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 21st, 2021, 6:49 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5768
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Mr Canoe Head wrote:
baking.

Photos show the lid of the cast iron dutch oven inverted to serve as a frying pan, and the purchased reflector. I don't have any experience with the GSI dutch oven.

If you're an outdoors enthusiast and a foodie I bet you could enjoy either or one of each, depending on your modes of travel.


Ha---you clean fish the same way I do---less wastage than fillets. "respect the resource". With the bones you just need to slow down and savor the flavor.

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 22nd, 2021, 3:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 21st, 2004, 10:52 am
Posts: 1145
Location: Near Ottawa ON
A Dutch oven relies on its thermal mass to moderate, hold and distribute heat. Mass = weight. A nice luxury to have if someone else is going to carry it.
If I plan on baking I'd rather keep my pack weight down and make do with using just my large-ish regular fire-pot (billy pot) using rocks as a stand-in for a real oven's thermal mass.
Fill it about 1/3 full or rocks. Leave it over the fire for a half-hour or so - longer and hotter than you'd first guess. Insert pan of whatever. Pile hot coals on lid. I had one rig where I'd invert the lid making a concave holder for the coals. Another had a little rim that would stop them from sliding off. Being a pot within a pot it's not a very big oven. And it's harder to manage the time and temperature to avoid the usual cooked-more-on-the-bottom-than-the-top issue. But everything is a trade-off and my standards are pretty low to begin with if I don't get it "perfect" every time - everything is "good" when I'm out there.
One time we found a large domed light aluminum pot lid in the midden of an old Cree winter camp. Built a fire on bedrock for an hour or so as we rose, kneaded and proofed some dough. Scraped the fire away. Put some small rocks down so pan wouldn't directly contact the hot bedrock and covered with lid. Scraped some of the fire back onto/around the lid. Worked fine.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 22nd, 2021, 10:16 am 
Offline

Joined: August 17th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Peterborough, Ontario Canada
guyfawkes041 wrote:
I made an ultralight folding reflector oven out of a disposable aluminum oven drip tray from a dollar store, 2 ACCO fasteners for binding stationary, a couple of small metal grommets, 2 kabab skewers, and a home sewn case.

Nice! That is a pretty clever design. The gauge of aluminum from those dollar store trays is a nice balance between weight and strength, makes good wind screens for stoves too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: June 13th, 2021, 4:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: August 17th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 24
Location: Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Forgot to mention this before but was reminded yesterday when we caught a laker that we didn't want to eat right away. I've used my reflector oven to smoke fish in the bush. I carry a small aluminum pizza pan with holes when I take the reflector. Good for toasting, reheating stuff. Every now and then I smoke fish with it. Salt, pepper, whatever spices then let it sit for a couple hours before smoking. If you can find new spruce or balsam tips (springtime), chop some in as well, they are great seasoning.


You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group