View topic - Just finished a home-sewn Anorak

It is currently September 26th, 2020, 6:30 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours





Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: February 7th, 2005, 10:22 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 18th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1648
Location: Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada
Well it wasn't the easiest project in the world, but I'm pretty pleased with the results.

This was a first attempt at a traditional cotton anorak - a wind shell designed to be worn over the insulating layer.

Deb and I worked from a basic pattern from "The Snowwalker's Companion" by Garret Connover. We modified things quite a bit, and worked a lot from photos we found on various web sites.

With this being a first attempt, we were figuring out a lot of things as we went. We probably put about 16 hours of work into this. A future attempt would go much quicker.

The Anorak is made from cotton-canvas in the form of painter's drop cloths from Canadian Tire. Same material I used for the canvas portions of my hot tent.

I've uploaded a few pictures of the "construction process" and the final result. I was head designer, and Debbie sewed her little fingers to the bone. Obviously I owe her big time right now.

Click here for the photos and a bit of info on the sewing operation.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 7th, 2005, 10:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: July 15th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1399
Location: Big Flats, New York USA
I'm impressed! That looks like a great piece of clothing for these winter trips.

Did you come up with a pattern that can be shared?

Thanks for sharing.
Tony


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 3:52 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1488
Location: Ontario, Canada
I have to agree. That's quite an impressive job you guys did!

I'd be interested in any patterns you might be willing to share.

Dave.

_________________
The Wilderness needs strong voices to protect it. And yours can be one of them.
Visit the Friends of Temagami website to learn more.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 7:06 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 24th, 2003, 8:38 am
Posts: 1329
Location: St. Thomas, Ontario
Very nice looking piece of clothing, and I'm sure very functional. Does the chin area open up (velcro ?) so the hood can lie back freely - if you know what I mean.

Please make sure you share my compliments with the brains of the endeavor, you do however make a good model. :lol:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 7:37 am 
Online

Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 729
Location: Simcoe, Ontario Canada
Well, I'm impressed.
I'll let you know when we have an opening for more sewers here, Richard
:D

Bob

_________________
morning sun, it's good for the soul


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 7:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: November 24th, 2003, 7:42 am
Posts: 151
Location: Mississauga
I'm really impressed too!! For the "do it yourself challenged" I would be very interested in purchasing such a practical item. I know that you can get synthetic similar items, but, are there any commercial firms selling cotten anoraks? ....unless Richard is willing to take orders......

Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 7:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 21st, 2003, 7:50 am
Posts: 2400
Location: Mapping Wabakimi PP!
It sure looks great! nice job. When do you find the time I'll never know. I espcially like the functional features you highlighted for the pockets and the waist straps. Also the belt accent piece is a nice touch!

Now all you need are "His and Her's" models :wink:

Boneli

_________________
It's all about forward progression!


"Preservation of our waterways comes from those with little voices, big paddles, strong backs, weak minds and thick hides with which to ignore the bug bites." Organizer of "The Wabakimi Project"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 8:33 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 18th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1648
Location: Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada
dks wrote:
I'm really impressed too!! For the "do it yourself challenged" I would be very interested in purchasing such a practical item. I know that you can get synthetic similar items, but, are there any commercial firms selling cotten anoraks?

Empire Canvas Works makes cotton Anoraks - they sell for $179 US (part of my motivation in sewing one) since freight and duty would bring the price up to $250 CDN

Hoop mentioned in another thread that he had a custom-made cotton anorak made for him by Sundog Outfitters, right here in Sudbury. Not sure about the pricing. They don't have info on their site about this, but you could always contact them. Jim and Jenny are great folks.

http://www.sundogoutfitters.com

Quote:
....unless Richard is willing to take orders......

My son suggested that after he saw the finished product. If you'd seen the look on Debbie's face, you'd understand why that isn't an option :wink:


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 10:27 am 
Offline

Joined: September 12th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 236
Location: San Antonio, Texas
Sure beats my ragtag assortment of winter clothing....

I like that trim work.

We did pick up a used sewing machine at the thrift store circuit this past Fall...but we haven't touched it with a ten foot pole...something about trying to figure out another mechanical devise when you don't have an owner's manual for it. We'll get to it...but probably not anytime soon.

Speaking of the Conover book...sure would have been nice to have read it by now...I tried getting a used copy on Amazon months ago...but they were out of stock. Still definately a book I'd like to acquire. Hmmm...maybe it's at the library....doubt it though.

Back to your anorak....hats off to you again....persistence pays.

-Mike


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 10:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 18th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1648
Location: Copper Cliff, Ontario, Canada
MVGMVG wrote:
Sure beats my ragtag assortment of winter clothing...


That's the joy of this outdoor stuff. You don't need a lot of expensive clothing to do just fine out there.

My sole investment into winter camping wear when I started this stuff was a set of micro-fleece underwear (tops and bottoms) which cost me about $50.

Beyond that, I just wore my regular canoeing nylon quick-dry pants, and a lot of fleece tops - some fairly decent, others from the thrift store. Top that off with an assortment of mitts, wool socks and (generally goofy-looking) hats and I've done just fine.

I snowshoed on a set of old traditional wood snowshoes for years. Finally bought a set of the high-tech aluminum ones the year before last, but I still use the wood ones for breaking trail.

I'm adding bits and pieces as I go along and come up with the money. This year's investment (birthday gift)was a pair of good wool pants. The Codet brand that are worth about $60. And of course, the anorak, which cost less than $50 for materials.

Don't let anyone tell you that you need all kinds of fancy GoreTex or "designer" outdoor gear. As long as you avoid cotton (T-shirts, sweatshirts and jeans) you'll do just fine.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 11:41 am 
Offline

Joined: July 30th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 36
Location: Sarnia, Ontario Canada
Richard, that is an excellent piece of work!!

I understand Debbie's reaction to mass making these things. I've made a couple of tarps and other camp "stuff". If I had to sell them, I'd want big $$ just for the frustration and effort involved.

If you are willing, it would be nice to see the pattern. It looks very functional and well thought out.

-franco


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 9:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1879
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Richard and Debbie,
Awesome job! I really like the hood design. Now, you simply MUST complete the outfit with an authentic Voyageur / Courier Du Bois sash for the waist. No, don’t argue with me. Not only does it look really good, but it is totally functional. Loose or tight, depending on conditions. Two sources I know of: Boris at Bushwhacker sells them, and so does the Manitoba Museum. Call the Museum Shop and they can send you one mail order.
http://www.manitobamuseum.mb.ca/mu_info.html

Yes try Sundog Outfitters for those interested in having an anorak made. Empire also makes an excellent anorak. Always get it very big for being airy and loose for pumping air.

I never use an insulated parka on winter trips anymore. I use fleece layers under the anorak, and toque and balaclava systems on the head and face, no matter how cold. Layer / de-layer as needed.

If you have never used a cotton anorak before, you will find that occasionally it does get wet. But no worries. It is on the outside. The heat gradient always moves the moisture out as long as you have modern wicking underwear and polyester fleece or wool underneath. I find that in -10 and warmer, the work exertion of making camp can sometimes cause the perspiration to be absorbed by the anorak, since relative humidity can be high at those warm temps. If it is warm out and snowing or if snow falls off vegetation, it gets wet when you are working hard. It is totally OK. It will dry by the fire as you wear it if cold camping, or dry in the hot tent. It does not even have to dry. It can freeze solid if stowed damp, but it remains flexible and will thaw instantly with the heat that is venting from a working body in winter.

I could not see the wrist cuffs from your photos. If not already designed, I recommend a snug adjustable wrist closure with velcro tabs. It makes getting into gauntlet mitts and gloves easier, and keeps the wrists warm.

Too bad winter is so short. I wish it would last 6 months of -20 weather with good sledding snow and ice. Some people hate me for wishing that though. 8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: anorak
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 10:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 8th, 2005, 10:34 pm
Posts: 726
looks good, Richard

for those who don't want to sew their own, there are some good ones out there - Empire Canvas has already been mentioned in this forum

another option if you happen to be visiting southern Labrador is a business called Moores' Handicrafts in L'Anse au Clair - I bought one from them last summer - very reasonably priced, custom fitted, and they shipped it so promptly that it was waiting for me when I got home from vacation

btw, in NL they call them "cossacks" rather than "anoraks"

if you google Moores' Handicrafts you can find them at http://www.grouptourplanner.com/supplier_3324.cfm


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 8th, 2005, 11:19 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1777
Location: London, Ontario CANADA
Wow!

Just had to comment what a great job done. Like franco, well maybe a little less than qualified than him , I too have become more accepting of sewing my own items including tarps, stuff sacks and a 60Litre Barrel harness amongst other home projects.

The Anorak is one of those things worth making, not to mention a tent.

Great Job once again !

_________________

[color=green]For love of the wilderness, A journey begins...[/color] [color=brown][b][Nature's Calling...] So get OFF(!) THAT(!!) THUNDERBOX !!![/b][/color]




Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 10th, 2005, 11:21 am 
Offline

Joined: April 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1152
Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
MIne's very similar, Richard. You'll sure enjoy it. I swear by the thing.

I modified it with full-length pit zips for ventilation. It opens at each side from wrist to waist.

I also made a button-on fur ruff for the front of the hood, which projects it forward another 2 inches or so. This is better for walking into the wind while out in the open of a frozen lake or whatever.

I'm glad you didn't cut away the side of the hood to improve "parking lot" visibility. This renders the thing useless for facial protection.

When I over-heat I pull it off, roll it up like a towel and tie it around my waist. Takes only seconds.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group