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PostPosted: October 18th, 2002, 6:40 pm 
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Joined: April 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ontario, Canada
I realize that car travel might not be considered the same as canoeing but, when traveling north in the winter, what do you do to prepare yourself for the possibility of a slide into a ditch along a backroad while visiting some friends that live in the backwoods of Northern Ontario?

Do you come prepared for winter camping just in case? Do you bring along dehydrated food in the event that you are stranded and the camping need arises?

Just curious on how others deal with the possibility of becoming stranded while traveling the north in the winter.


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PostPosted: October 19th, 2002, 2:38 pm 
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Joined: April 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ontario, Canada
I'll be traveling north a few times this winter and would really like some info on how others pack for the "just-in-case" senario.

Anyone with ideas? Please?


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PostPosted: October 19th, 2002, 2:58 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1654
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
All of the extended winter travel I've done was in the Rockies in the midst of an 18 month road trip, with backpacking, paddling, hunting and fishing gear in the truck, so there wasn't much that I *didn't* have with me.

I'd say the most important thing to have would be a sleeping bag. Staying warm is tops. Then probably a full set of spare (ie dry) winter clothes. Food. Matches/lighter.

Maybe a shovel. Axe/saw.

CB radio or cell phone (depending on cell coverage...and, uh, I don't own a cell phone or want one, but we've used the wife's to obtain assistance on two occasions of blown transmissions).

Breaking it down to basics you need shelter, warmth, water, food:

Shelter = Vehicle
Warmth = Sleeping bag & spare clothes
Water = That's tougher. Spare water in the vehicle will just freeze. Maybe it's matches/lighter/pot to melt ice?
Food - Well, hopefully you won't be stranded long enough to starve, but an MRE or freeze dried dinner might take the edge off.

I remember reading about a guy a few years ago who got stranded in a snowstorm on a secondary road in the rockies, a road that closed for the winter and didn't get reopened 'til Spring. He just sat in the vehicle for a month+ and slowly starved to death.

I think at some point I'd have yanked out the spare tire, back seat and whatever else and lit one big, black smokey last resort signal fire in hopes that the Forest Service would come looking.

Ok then, right up there with having a sleeping bag would be having someone who knows your travel plans, approximate route, dates & times...just in case you don't show up.


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PostPosted: October 19th, 2002, 6:46 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: London, Ontario CANADA
I do have an emergency kit in my vehicle I carry as well my single candle lantern and a few pkg.s of hot chocolate. There's always a cup in the vehicle (Timmy's)

I pick up candy as a in-vehicle snack so there's something in the vehicle already and usually I'll bring my snow pants, touque and jacket, just in case for the flat tire or dead vehicle walk, back to a known location.

In my pouch with the lantern, i also have a whistle ( fox 40 ) a LED light (very small) a knife, some Advil ( that ocassionally gets refilled/use), compass, extra candle for the lantern, a lighter ( I don't smoke) and some trail marking tape...

I make it known the W5 (who, what where, when, and why) and my expected time of return.

I figure the pouch and kit do have most of what I need even for a spring,fall outing that I should be able to ride out the storm and be found.

In the off winter season I carry a change of basic clothes in behind the passengers seat.

I do drive a van and the little bit to carry doesn't really get in the way for me.

Last year, I had a 10 Litre container of water left over so I kept it in the vehicle for the winter. Temps, really took some time for it to freeze solid. I figured it was worth taking...

Georgi

I should have also said that most of this stuff is now in the vehicle as well a pair of fleece lined work gloves.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Georgi on 2002-10-19 19:53 ]</font>


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PostPosted: October 19th, 2002, 9:13 pm 
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Joined: June 21st, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Burlington, Wisconsin USA
I don't carry all that much in the way of emergency supplies since it really isn't far to get help here around home. I usually have a pair of Sorels, warm hat, and a pair of insulated coveralls. If I'm headed up north I would be headed to the cabin and would have a weekend's worth of food and drink in the truck.

Scott


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PostPosted: October 20th, 2002, 1:48 am 
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Joined: May 19th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 24
Location: RR#1 Perkinsfield, Ontario Canada
You can never be too prepared for winter emergencies as far as I'm concerned. This comes after almost freezing to death in an emergency situation several years back. If not for a true guardian angel, I wouldn't be here today. I now have packed in the back of my van a -5 sleeping bag, down jacket, snowmobile boots, flashlight, small shovel, flare, matches, candle, salt for de-icing, extra socks, granola bars, warm hat and gloves. It packs very nicely into a small box and doesn't take any room at all.
My job takes me on the road on a frequent basis and I'll be darned if I put myself in danger again.


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PostPosted: October 20th, 2002, 8:13 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3180
Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
Some great ideas here! I will have to rethink my kit. Not having a lot of room under the seats to put stuff, I carry for each person in the family:
1 pair of heavy wool socks
1 hat
1 pr mitts
1 silver emergency blanket
2 granola bars
2 plastic bags (to slide over anyone's runners!)


plus:
1 "call police" sign
2 tin cans (1 with holes in the bottom to put the candle in, and a slightly larger one to put water in)
1 long burn emergency candle
2 flares (battery operated with fresh batteries)
1 blanket
2 pair of leggings (great if you have to get out and plow around in a skirt)
5 old floor mats that have been used many times to help others gain traction to get out of the ditch
1 retractable handle, wide blade shovel
jumper cables

After a car accident recently where I was rear ended in the middle of a rain storm and after 20 min no one had stopped or even called to report it to the police, my hubby added in a cell phone.

This is what I carry around the town and for short urban trips. Further away we always carry more food and full snow gear.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: cheryl on 2002-10-20 21:18 ]</font>


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