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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 11:49 am 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Simcoe, Ontario Canada
I am going to be picking up a new pair of winter boots and want to make sure that they will be good for snowshoing/winter camping. I have read that it is best to get a tie-top with no felt exposed at the top, but where to go from there? Leather uppers vs. Nylon etc.? I saw an ad for a pair of Sorels that looked pretty awesome with a leather top.
Any thoughts or comments?


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 12:25 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Wellington ON
Might be able to save you a bit of $$ here, Bob. Check out the line of OVERBOOTS from NEOS. They are meant to be worn over light or medium duty hikers. They have insulated and summer models of varying heights and they're all waterproof and compatable with snowshoe bindings. I bought a pair of their Voyageur model to wear over my hiking boots to do a major backpacking trip this year and I was very impressed. My wife has since purchased the knee high, insulated Adventurer model. You should be able to get them for around $100 depending on the model.

Dann


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 12:59 pm 
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On 2002-11-22 12:25, Kanoe wrote:
Might be able to save you a bit of $$ here, Bob. Check out the line of OVERBOOTS from NEOS.


Not bad! But where do you get them in Canada? It doesn't seem to be the kind of thing to buy online without testing with your hicking boots.

AnOtherAnon


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 1:05 pm 
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Joined: June 24th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Gatineau, Secteur Hull (Québec)
The Sorels _are_ awesome. They're good not only for snowshoing, but for hiking in shallow snow, wet conditions, etc.

r.


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 1:27 pm 
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Location: Wellington ON
Trailhead carries the NEOS line of overboots.

Dann


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 1:50 pm 
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Joined: August 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Cheltenham, Ontario Canada
Regarding Sorels:

The original Sorels by Kaufmann are out of production. The Sorel name has been bought by Columbia Sportwear out of the States, and they are putting the Sorel sticker on a line of boots from China. If you do a 'net search you will find disclaimers all over the place by both retailers in Canada selling out old Kaufmann stock and by Columbia saying even their liners aren't compatible with the old Sorel line.

As it happens, I have two pairs of Kaufmann Sorels I would sell. Camo men's size 13 and black women's size 7. Rated to -70 F. Used less than 10 times each.

I don't know what they're worth.

kk


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 1:51 pm 
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Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Duluth, MN USA
kamiks or mukluks are the only way to go in cold weather


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 4:10 pm 
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Joined: August 24th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Mississauga, Ontario Canada
Where can you find a good pair of leather mukluks ? I've looked everywhere and can't seem to locate any . If any body knows I would be grateful .


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 8:11 pm 
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Joined: June 27th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ontario Canada
I can't speak for Neos with snowshoes, as I have always worn my (old) Sorels, but I have light weight Neos that I use as winter (city) over-shoes. Bought in Mississauga, Ont., at one of those shoe warehouse / discounters, at Mavis and Brittania Roads. Under $50, and truly useful. Aggressive lugged soles, waterproof, easy-on, easy-off.


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PostPosted: November 22nd, 2002, 11:19 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Wahta Mohawk Territory
I bought a pair of Sorels last year that say made in Viet Nam. Is there the same caveat as the ones made in China?

We didn't have enough snow here last year to give them a workout, although I now have a decent pair of wooden and hide snowshoes, I expect that will change this year.

Cal White
Wahta MT


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PostPosted: November 23rd, 2002, 1:21 am 
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Although "over-booties" might be acceptable for day tripping on snowshoes or waiting for a bus, your original post also stated winter camping.

Most winter campers prefere calf-high with thickly insulated removable liners. Don't forget manufacturer ratings are for moderate levels of activity. Winter camping means lots of standing around.
You want lots of room for an extra insole and at least one pair of really heavy-duty wool socks - maybe two at the end of the day.

BTW a good brand like Baffin and rated for a minus 40 are about 70 bucks Canadian. If your going to scrimp on something, don't let it be your boots.
cheers, Ted


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PostPosted: November 23rd, 2002, 10:10 am 
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Joined: April 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
Craig MacDonald, of Dwight, On., makes and sells moosehide mukluks with canvas uppers. These are simply the nicest things to have on your feet when you're walking in the snow. They're incredibly light and (since there are no coatings of any kind, which allows them to breathe unrestricted) always dry. EXCEPT when the temp gets up around freezing. Then warmth from the sun or your foot starts melting the snow, and they'll get wet.

Their liners are not felt. They're duffel -- 2 layers. (Duffel is heavy wool blanket material.) Best quality. If you have one pair of heavy wool socks, the duffel, a felt insole underneath and the moosehide to walk on, you'll be warm and you feet won't sweat.

In melt weather, traditionally these would be worn inside rubber overshoes (or even plastic bags) to keep the water out. Now, it's more practical (when dealing with slush and liquid water on lakes) to wear rubber boots bought a size too large. These are worn with 2 pairs of heavy socks, and a felt insole is put in the bottom to step on. (I know this looks farmerish, but it simply works better.) At melt temperatures the cold is not a problem. The insole holds the accumulated moisture and is dried out overnight (hot tent camping).

The only mukluk fly-in-the-insole is white-man's feet. Some of us are accustomed to having support (a firm sole) under our feet all the time. It's very liberating to get past this and wear the mukluks (it's like being barefoot in the snow), but you don't want sore feet on a snowshoe trip. The cross-web of the traditional showshoe (that your foot pivots on) can feel like a stone by the end of the first day. Best to try it out on short trips/day hikes.

If you go the Sorel/Kaufman route, remember that the 60-below versions end up being very tall at the foot, sometimes so tall that they won't fit in the opening of a traditional snowshoe as your foot pivots. With boots like these you may be forced to buy one of the modern snowshoes that have a fixed binding. These are not to everyone's taste -- not by a long shot.

I don't have a number for Craig, but I'm sure his is listed. The mukluks weren't expensive, considering the quality. I paid under $100.


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PostPosted: November 23rd, 2002, 10:25 am 
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Location: Cheltenham, Ontario Canada
Lee Ann and I both wear mukluks from Steger. They're expensive, but their catalog and web site provide lots of information you could equally apply to another brand name.

800-mukluks

http://www.mukluks.com

kk


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PostPosted: November 23rd, 2002, 11:27 am 
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
I don't find the choice of footwear particularly critical when snowshoeing. I bought a pair of Kamiks at last year's "boxing week' sale at Sears, Which work well. The temp rating of -20 or whatever is an exxageration, though. Before that I wore my steel toe hiker boots from work, which worked fairly well too(walked for 5-6 hrs on several different weekends.)


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PostPosted: November 23rd, 2002, 4:02 pm 
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Joined: October 1st, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Sechelt, BC
Last year both my wife and I bought our winter boots made by Acton. These boots are similar to the Sorels, with the so called felt liners. Actually the liners are now made in a 3 ply material, with some sort of aluminized reflective material. They come with what is called a frost plug mesh insole that will gather any moisture and keeps it away from the main liner and can be removed easily. These boots are made in Canada and are in our estimation the warmest boot we have worn. We are out constantly in all weather and have never had cold or even cool feet. Last year I fell through a beaver pond while snowshoeing and was up to thighs in water. Which filled by boots. I tipped by leg up and dumped whatever I could out without taking them off and headed back to the car which was about 3 km away. The temperature was around -25C and when I got back to the car my feet were still warm. We purchased these from Marks Workwear and priced at about $110.00. My wifes, because she has smaller feet was able to get boys boots and were around $70.00. These are great boots. We are going to purchase an extra set of liners and insoles to take on the Winter Gathering. Actually the boots is one reason my wife is going on this expedition because she knows her feet will not be cold. Dave made one point that is true and persons who are buying boots for shoeshoeing have to watch that the toe of the boots are not too tall or thick because they may not fit into the harness's. Some of the Sorel's are too big in this area.
This is our 2 cents worth
Dan


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