View topic - Switching Paddling Solo on Ferries

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PostPosted: June 17th, 2005, 9:57 am 
Steve Boal wrote:
>Let's not forget that, just as the best canoe is the one you have,
>the best strokes are the ones that get you there.

Indeed, I was forced one time to use hit and switch to get where
I wanted, just because I was too exhausted to go on otherwise,
and because...

TommyC1 wrote:
>I wonder how much the boat you are in determines what technique
>works best?

...the canoe I was paddling in that time was designed for that
switching technique. I think with my other solo canoe
this probably would not have happened? We will never know.
But I do suspect that there are indeed some differences in
boat design that seem to influence the paddling technique needed.

Dirk Barends


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PostPosted: June 17th, 2005, 1:12 pm 
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Location: Coldstream, Ontario Canada
Boat designs play a major part in the different strokes we use. To factors that will cause one to use different methods are boat depth and bow and midship widths. Lets look at some of these newer shorter playboat designs..... there isn`t a whole lot of glide happening there ! So we have to move away from negative stokes in the stern when we can. It depends on the boat, but lets compare the Zoom to the Rival, If you watch me paddle when I`m in the Zoom you`ll see a much higher percentage of cross bow forwards and cross bow Duffeks or draws then you would ever see me using in a Rival. There is just more glid and tracking in the Rival, plus its wider so it takes longer to go from one side to the other and you don`t have the reach. So with even smaller boats like a Taureau or a C1 its more so that we move away from stern corrections all together. ( Unless I`m paddling a flat section, then you`ll see me lilly dipping with stern corrections like the "J " ) :wink:


So in current if the boat is moving slower than the speed of the water you`ll send it spinning around and out of control in the waves.The same applies in ferring...... its about boat speed. But in any current we have the water working for us, thats if we use it right. And that`s where boat angle comes into play, using boat angle will make your job a whole lot easier. Its all about paddling smart, not hard !

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Al Greve http://www.canoewateradventuring.ca South Western Ontario's canoeing specialist



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PostPosted: June 19th, 2005, 8:30 pm 
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Well said :D

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Did you "C" that?!!!


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PostPosted: June 26th, 2005, 11:48 am 
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Location: Canmore AB
John et al Two comments here;
To preface my comments, my paddling background is MB. YMCA camp guy Learned the CRCA way. Was a CRCA instructor at CRCA instructor schools. Moving water experience was pool drop types of rivers. We never pried, always used a Cross bow draw. The Goon Stroke was frowned upon.
I now, live in The Rockies, paddle mostly gradient rivers.
1. In moving water solo or tandem I NEVER use a J stoke. For me to go from a position of having my wrists turned down to do the J (correction) or even doing a Canadian stroke,I am momentarily in a position of not being able to retrieve my paddle and go into a brace. I use a river J or 'goon stroke' It's quicker to initiate and to recover from. I can easily go from this position into a pry or recover my paddle to do a draw.
2. Weight distribution in a solo boat will make a difference in how it tracks vs turns. Whether I'm front or backferrying I can lean forward or back depending on what I want the boat to do. In a FF I will lean back to turn and forward to track the boat and in a BF I do the opposite. In a front ferry situation that started this thread, I wouldn't switch but would use weight and appropriate strokes to move forward.
Hugh

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PostPosted: June 26th, 2005, 1:08 pm 
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Alan Greve wrote:
Boat designs play a major part in the different strokes we use. To factors that will cause one to use different methods are boat depth and bow and midship widths.


Not to mention rocker!!! Bow corrections work great in playboats that are short and have lots of rocker. It takes a massive wave to pin the bow on the boat so that a bow correction won't work. But take a boat like the MRC Guide (Freedom solo), on any kind of attainment maneuver on a steep wave the pointy bow pins and bow corrections are useless. If you want to control the direction of the boat you better be doing stern corrections, because you can't break the bow wake with a bow draw or pry.

PK


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