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PostPosted: March 20th, 2011, 5:51 pm 
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March Break 2011: A week off, and what to do?
Head "home", to the beautiful Temagami Wilderness, of course...

While packing up, and looking around our yard at home near Peterborough, I was debating the merits of packing our winter hot-tenting outfit, complete with our XC skis, boots, and snowshoes.
Given the state of the snow conditions (or lack thereof) in our neck of the woods, I wasn't sure the skis and snowshoes would be of much use...

Arriving in Temagami, we were pleasantly surprised: Only a few hours drive North, winter was still alive and well.

And now the details...
We "cheated" a little bit on this trip:
We were picked up by snowmobile by our friends, and driven to the North end of Obabika Lake, where we spent our first night at the Mathias' cabin located at the mouth of the Obabika river, deep in the heart of Temagami's Old Growth forest.

The next morning we loaded up the sleigh at the cabin, and set off for our destination: "McIntosh Point" on Obabika Lake.

Here's a shot of our gear pile, before being loaded on the sled:

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Once loaded up, we headed out on the lake under beautiful sunny skies and warm temperatures. I pulled the sleigh while Jenn carried a pack. I'm still amazed how light we can travel, even with a week's worth of food, gear, hot tent and stove. The right gear makes all the difference.


After arriving and setting up on McIntosh Point, we set to preparing the all-important firewood supply.

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Because the forecast was calling for warmer temperatures and the possibility of rain, I made sure to set up some solid rain-fly rigging over our set-up.
On this trip, I also packed my Ostrom Canoe Table, that proved invaluable as our outdoor kitchen, freeing up more living space inside the hot tent.

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As we always do, we built a snow sleeping bench along the back half of the tent, and lined the sleeping area and floor with balsam boughs.

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We spent the next few days exploring the area on XC skis, reading, relaxing, cooking some great meals, and just enjoying the Temagami winter wilderness.

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A few shots of some of my "hot-tent culinary abilities"
Stew in the dutch oven on the wood stove:

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One of my trip staples - cedar tea:

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And my favorite breakfast technique:
Making toast on the wood stove: better than at home.

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One of my favorite experiences while hot tenting is sitting around the wood stove in the evening, reading a good book.

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Reading Mike Henry and Peter Quinby's book: Ontario's Old Growth Forests, while camped in the Old Growth.

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In the end, it was a great week: visits with great friends, exceptional weather at times, challenging weather at other times, but that's what we've come to expect with wilderness travel. It's also what keeps it interesting.
Over the course of the week we had temps ranging from +12c to -20c and everything in between.


I can honestly say, I could not envision a better way to spend my March vacation.
My winter trips to Obabika have become an annual tradition.
... Now, only a few weeks 'till canoeing season ... :thumbup:


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PostPosted: March 21st, 2011, 7:48 am 
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Great post / photos Mike. It certainly looks like you had a nice time. Well done.

FYI: http://www.snowtrekkertents.com/ ... great read.


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PostPosted: March 21st, 2011, 6:18 pm 
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I have a couple questions.

How's the Stove on BTU's? - keeps it warm, or you roasting

How do you like the stove exit out of the Top of the tent ?

In your other post I didn't see you using a tarp over the tent, photo purposes, I'm guessing.

Cheers

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PostPosted: March 21st, 2011, 9:45 pm 
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Very nice indeed.

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PostPosted: March 21st, 2011, 10:37 pm 
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Completely awesome!

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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2011, 5:23 pm 
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Georgi wrote:
I have a couple questions.
How's the Stove on BTU's? - keeps it warm, or you roasting


The stove definitely keeps us warm, but I it may be a little undersized for an 8x10 wall tent. I bought this stove with my Kifaru tent, and for that application, it's a perfect fit. For this tent, I am planning on buying the larger Kifaru stove (maybe next year if I can sell my Kifaru rig to pay for my new stove :wink: ...). This stove keeps the new tent hot, but I think the larger model would heat with less effort and be better for drying mitts, boot liners, etc...
It is certainly never "roasting" in the tent, but I tend to think that is unnecessary.


Georgi wrote:
How do you like the stove exit out of the Top of the tent ?


I specifically requested the stove jack to be placed in the top of the tent. The manufacturer normally puts them through the side wall, but will accomodate any special requests.
The reason I wanted it going through the roof was because of the Kifaru roll-up stove pipe. You can't use an elbow on these pipes. Despite this minor drawback, I still feel the Kifaru collapsible stoves are the best on the market. They really can't be beat.
Having the stove exit through the roof does make tarp rigging more complicated, but as you can see below, it's not really a big deal.

Georgi wrote:
In your other post I didn't see you using a tarp over the tent, photo purposes, I'm guessing.


This is actually the first time I've ever set it up with a tarp over it.
I've never understood the need to rig a tarp in actual winter conditions: the tent sheds snow well, and the snow that does stay on the roof just melts and runs off without any problems.
On this trip, the weather was warm, with rain in the forecast, so we opted to rig a couple of MEC Guide's Tarps over the camp. We had one evening of rain - heavy at times, and the tarps gave me piece of mind.

Here's a picture of our camp, all tarped out:

Image


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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2011, 5:32 pm 
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Mike: The last time I saw you winter camping you managed to carry the whole rig on your back all the way up Shish Kong portage and I was truly impressed with your fortitude and skill.
Now it seems you winter camp mostly the way I do ... in the lap of luxury.... you got hauled in behind a snow machine, stayed the first night in a warm cabin and I even see a little table there, to hold your stove.

So I have to conclude that you must be either getting older or closer to getting married. :wink:


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PostPosted: March 22nd, 2011, 10:25 pm 
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What's a couple of pounds, eh!

:wink:

Thanks for the added picture.

The Hot-tent roasting is a treat to watch the cook sweat while making dinner, makes for entertainment while you banter at them at the 30C indoor temperature....

The Tarp over the tent , well, I have seen it rain inside a wall tent without tarping! The tarp provides the tent to stay warm and the snow to stay cool and slide off and like you said , just gives you peace of mind.

Its not going to keep the heat in when the stove is off but its a helper when your in a heavy snow and there's a load ontop the tent. A quick shake and you have less stress sitting on the tent. It also acts as a lean-to where you can stash gear so there's no need to refind your gear you put outdoors and a new blanket of fresh snow covers your camp.

Thanks again,

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PostPosted: March 23rd, 2011, 7:15 am 
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Apparently I am not wise in the ways of winter camping toast making. How do you get the bread to stick to the side of the stove?

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PostPosted: March 23rd, 2011, 3:17 pm 
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Mac wrote:
Mike: The last time I saw you winter camping you managed to carry the whole rig on your back all the way up Shish Kong portage and I was truly impressed with your fortitude and skill.
Now it seems you winter camp mostly the way I do ... in the lap of luxury.... you got hauled in behind a snow machine, stayed the first night in a warm cabin and I even see a little table there, to hold your stove.

So I have to conclude that you must be either getting older or closer to getting married. :wink:


That's is some funny stuff there! :rofl:

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PostPosted: March 24th, 2011, 7:47 am 
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Mac wrote:
Mike: The last time I saw you winter camping you managed to carry the whole rig on your back all the way up Shish Kong portage and I was truly impressed with your fortitude and skill.


Ed,
Does this mean you are no longer impressed with my fortitude and skill ?!? That hurts, man. :wink:



Mac wrote:
So I have to conclude that you must be either getting older or closer to getting married. :wink:


Maybe a little of both...
What can I say? Life is good.
(But I still have the fast & light Kifaru gear for when I want to travel solo...)


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PostPosted: March 24th, 2011, 10:11 am 
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I am still impressed Mike.
And I do like your winter camp set up. You have all of the conveniences but not nearly the weight.
Yeah I know, you did have some extra stuff along on this recent trip, but that is the price you have to pay to convince others to come along and enjoy the cold weather with you.....


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