View topic - Hot-tent: what's your rig?

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PostPosted: September 19th, 2006, 6:40 pm 
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Joined: April 18th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 419
Location: Beamsville, Ontario Canada
Tent style (home-made or store-bought)?
Frame (internal/freestanding or do you cut poles)?
Weight?
Approx set-up time?


I'm thinking of upgrading my old canvas rig to something like the Snowtrekker's short wall hybrid. I'm torn between sewing or buying one. Either way, I need to justify the cost of upgrading to the boss-lady :lol:


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PostPosted: September 19th, 2006, 7:42 pm 
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Joined: October 1st, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 529
Location: Sechelt, BC
We made a 10' x 12' Prospector Tent, all ripstop nylon.The area adjacent to the stove is heavier cotton, made from Painters drop cloths. The peak and side walls have loops sewn in about 12" apart. The sod cloth is made from clear fabric tarps and are 12" wide and extend about a foot past the sides. Front flap is closed by a heavy duty zipper as opposed to tie tabs. We installed a small vent at the back with a velcro flap.
The stove thimble is installed on the front flap and is made from light sheet metal. We rely on cutting poles and must carry a fly in case of rain or heavy snow. Tent weight 9.5 lbs not including the fly. We are very pleased with this rig however we are thinking on building a slightly smaller tent for just 2 people.
Thinking of a modified Baker.


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PostPosted: September 19th, 2006, 8:13 pm 
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Joined: March 19th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 512
Location: Mt Brydges, Ontario Canada
Keep us posted on that Merlin. I've wondered about a convertable tent that could be both a Baker tent and a hottent for winter.

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The idea of wilderness needs no defense.
It only needs more defenders.

Edward Abbey


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2006, 6:46 am 
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Joined: April 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1145
Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
I have a Wall Tent and a Baker Tent. The Baker tent is set up in summer so that the vestibule roof is horizontal. That's no good in winter because of snowfall. (You could end up going for a day-hike and return to a collapsed tent.)

But there is a photo or sketch in "Song of the Paddle" of the tent set up to shed wind. In that mode, the vestibule roof is brought down to the ground, and the sidewalls are wrapped over it. This would work in winter since you need a flysheet anyway to encourage snow to slide off. You lose some space, but you do enclose a volume of air which you can then heat up. And both sides then slope.

The modifications required would be a stove thimble set into one of the sidewalls, and a door made into the other.

Or, you could build the tent with 2 sets of sidewalls (tie or zip on) -- one each for summer and winter use. The winter ones would allow a sloping roof.


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2006, 8:14 am 
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Joined: May 14th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 188
Location: Toronto, Ontario
kifaru, 4 person, nylon tipi
bought on-line
one pole, internal
8.1 pounds (13.4 with stove and pipe)
10-15 minutes
bit longer in the winter (need to trample snow, etc.)

it has its good and bad points and its idiosyncrasies. i've used it in pretty heavy snow, pretty cold weather (-20C) and for more than 2 weeks. probably not as comfortable as a campfire tent, but i can't complain really. pegs/stakes can be murder to pull out after a while. very stable in wind and rain.


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2006, 8:20 am 
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Joined: April 18th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 419
Location: Beamsville, Ontario Canada
Merlin - Where did you get your design for the prospector. Pics? Also, where do you get ripstop nylon?


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2006, 7:47 pm 
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Joined: November 25th, 2004, 8:36 am
Posts: 167
Location: Gravenhurst, Ontario
Well, here's my rig:
Image
It is a purchased 10 x 12 wall tent that is very spacious, but very heavy and cumbersome to set up. If I were going to do trips where I set-up for a night or two, I think I would save my pennies and buy one of the Snowtrekkers. The internal aluminum frames eliminate the wood pole issue in provincial parks, and the overall weight of the tent and poles are quite reasonable. I have made some bristol board models of that style of tent, but haven't gotten around to trying to make one. Textile outfitters in Calgary sells nylon, and also sells regular weight canvas that is fire retardant.

Good luck with the deliberations.


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PostPosted: September 21st, 2006, 7:42 am 
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Joined: March 19th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 512
Location: Mt Brydges, Ontario Canada
I've seen a few successful modifications that turned a regular tent into a hot tent. I noticed this one on ebay, it's kind of small at 4 person, but still has more room then the 4 person kifaru tipi would have. It's also canvas, but has a nylon floor that would need to be opened.

http://cgi.ebay.ca/Canvas-Dome-Tent-OzT ... dZViewItem

_________________
The idea of wilderness needs no defense.
It only needs more defenders.

Edward Abbey


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PostPosted: September 21st, 2006, 9:52 am 
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Joined: October 1st, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 529
Location: Sechelt, BC
Our tent looks like Hack's, but made from untreated ripstop nylon we picked up at Wally World. Getting really hard to find there now.
As far as the design, we did not use any ready-made plans. We designed our own, and the shape works well. I have been asked by a few people for the plans, and I would gladly share them, if I could find them. I put them away so I wouldn't loose them , and guess what.

I would send some pictures except we are sitting in sunny BC right now, overlooking Lake Okanagan and vineyards. :lol:


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PostPosted: September 21st, 2006, 10:05 am 
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Joined: November 25th, 2004, 8:36 am
Posts: 167
Location: Gravenhurst, Ontario
Here's a link for Textile Outfitters


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PostPosted: September 21st, 2006, 5:56 pm 
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Joined: September 12th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 236
Location: San Antonio, Texas
When I did my hot tent....I was looking for ease of setup.

I perused Ebay for a month a two.

Once I saw a photo of it...I knew it could be retrofitted.

I had a lot of fun going that route.....(working with something that was already functional for general tenting, then converting to a hot tent application).

Now if I could only get back to a Deep Freeze, I'd be a happy camper.

-Mike
P.S. I think in the archives here there are some posts I made while it was under construction. Probably the keyword "retrofit" would bring it up.


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PostPosted: October 17th, 2006, 7:12 pm 
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Joined: October 17th, 2006, 6:45 pm
Posts: 1
Image

Image

Image

Empire Canvas Snowtrekker 8 x 10 (early edition) internal frame
Matching stove
Granite Gear Pulk
Set-up time approx. 15 minutes/30-40 if I dig out the snow which I usually do.

A warm and toasty setup that has seen some nasty weather across northern WI and northern MN (BWCA). It has come through with wonderful performance. Cozy in a blow. Stove is a bit heavy and looking to lighten the load soon. Great for wilderness ice fishing and ski trips. Sometimes we rough it and bring two cots for extra comfy digs. Sleeps three but two is better.


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PostPosted: October 18th, 2006, 1:36 am 
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Joined: October 16th, 2004, 7:30 am
Posts: 226
Location: Truth or Consequences, New Mexico
I use my summer Coleman cheap 4 man tent with a good sized vestibule and an Alladin Blue Fame heater to keep body and sole warm. The kerosene heater has kept my wife and I alive for thirty years.

We use -40 bags and just light the Alladin to get warm, turn it down at bed time, make the coffee pot and the first one up just turns up the flame to boil the coffee in the AM.

By the time the coffee perks and is ready and the tent is warm. Maybe an hour? It sure is a nice way to wake up.

I would then look after the dogs and she would cook breakfast. After an hour or so we were off.

A chain saw is nice because we would have to cook 35 lbs of oat and barley chop to fed the mutts, melting snow for a cooker is a long task. Evening took 2 to 3 hours but after all it was winter - dark at 3:00 PM.

Dog Sled camping is the best!

But, you need a system and also keep the weight down.

The Alladin heaters can still be found on the internet. In New Foundland they were used all the time - carrying them from one room to the other. They are the best!

Greg Allen


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PostPosted: October 18th, 2006, 7:11 pm 
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Joined: July 2nd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 275
Location: Connecticut
I bought mine on line from western US, I ordered the frame corners with it and cut my own pipe for the frame. The frame weighs a ton. "Weigh" too heavy to haul in.

http://sports.webshots.com/photo/202091 ... 5782fDTGIP

We can't cut standing trees in the Northeast US, so that's a problem for me. I have 3 poles I cut and peeled this spring, hopefully I can figure a way to haul them into the bush on my sled.

I like the tent, but will probably look for something smaller.
I need to learn alot about winter camping to say the least. :cry:

I know, the stove pipe should come out the front, soon i hope


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